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Tag: Mississippi River
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  • April

    CAP 1135 Leech Lake Dam Fish Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration

    The purpose of the project is to provide a hydraulic connectivity for aquatic organisms to pass from the Leech River upstream to Leech Lake.
  • February

    Dam Bridge & Gate Painting – Lower St. Anthony Falls Through Lock and Dam 10

    The project is the routine maintenance, including painting and repair of the dam gates. Phase 1 consisted of report development, including alternatives and life cycle costs. Phase 2 of the project analyzed the alternatives, and decided upon an Indefinite Delivery – Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) acquisition strategy with maintenance performed on site.
  • March

    Disposition Study, Lower St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam, and Lock and Dam 1, Upper Mississippi

    Determine whether or not continued operation and ownership of Lower St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam and Lock and Dam 1 are in the federal interest, and if not, provides supporting information for deauthorization of the project purposes and disposal of the property.
  • Disposition Study, Upper St. Anthony Falls and Lock and Dam, Upper Mississippi River

    Determine whether or not continued operation and ownership of Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam (USAF) is in the federal interest, and if not, provide supporting information for deauthorization of the project purposes and disposal of the property. USAF is located on the Mississippi River in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
  • February

    Dredged Material Management Plans - Upper Mississippi River

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District is responsible for maintaining 244 miles of the Upper Mississippi River 9-foot channel navigation system from the head of navigation at Minneapolis, Minnesota, at river mile 857.6 to Guttenberg, Iowa at river mile 614.0. The navigation system also includes the lower navigable portions of the Minnesota, St. Croix, and Black Rivers. Long term planning for dredged material placement has been ongoing since the mid-1970’s, starting with the GREAT (Great River Environmental Action Team) study from 1974 -1980 and is actively managed to maximize beneficial use of the material.
  • Habitat Restoration: Mississippi River, Capoli Slough, Pool 9

    Part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program, the site is a side channel/island complex located on the Wisconsin side of the Mississippi River navigation channel in Pool 9, about five miles downstream of Lansing, Iowa. The site is in the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge. Many of the natural islands bordering the navigation channel and extending into the backwater have eroded and many are disappearing. Erosion from wave action and main channel flows is reducing the size of the wetland complex, resulting in the loss of aquatic vegetation and the shallow protected habitats important for the survival of many species of fish and wildlife.
  • Habitat Restoration: Mississippi River, Harpers Slough, Pool 9, Iowa

    Part of the Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program, the Harpers Slough area is a 4,150-acre backwater area located primarily on the Iowa side of the Mississippi River in Pool 9, about 3 miles upstream of Lock and Dam 9. The site is in the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge. The area is used heavily by tundra swans, Canada geese, puddle and diving ducks, black terns, nesting eagles, bitterns and cormorants and is also significant as a fish nursery area. Many of the islands in the area have been eroded or lost because of wave action and ice movement. The loss of islands allows more turbulence in the backwater area, resulting in less productive habitat for fish and wildlife.
  • March

    Lock and Dam 5A, Embankment and Levee Certification

    The LD5A embankment is located along the Mississippi River about 3-1/2 river miles above the City of Winona, Minnesota, and about 3 river miles below Fountain City, Wisconsin. The St. Paul District is responsible for operation and maintenance of the LD5A embankment, as part of the LD5A dam project, authorized for the purposes of navigation and recreation. The Winona, Flood Risk Management Project was authorized by the Flood Control Act of 1958, of which the LD5A embankment was used as part of the line of protection. The LD5A embankment is approximately15,500 feet in length from its high ground tie-in point at Minnesota City, Minnesota, to the southern tie-in with the Winona FRMP.
  • February

    Lower Pool 2 Channel Management Study

    Pool 2 is the navigation pool created by the construction of Lock and Dam 2 at Hastings, Minnesota, at river mile 815.2. The pool is approximately 32.4 miles long and stretches upstream to Lock and Dam 1 in Minneapolis at river mile 847.6 (often referred to as the Ford Dam). Between river miles 818 and 820, the navigation channel switches from one bank of the river to the other and back again creating a near 90-degree bend in the river at mile 819.
  • March

    Lower Pool 4 Dredged Material Management Plan – Wabasha County, Minnesota; Buffalo and Pepin Counties, Wisconsin

    The Lower Pool 4 DMMP study area is located between Lock and Dam 4 and the foot of Lake Pepin, river miles 753.0 to 764.0. The study area includes the Minnesota communities in Wabasha County of Lake City, Wabasha, Reads Landing and Kellogg and the Wisconsin communities in Buffalo and Pepin Counties of Nelson, Alma and Buffalo City.
  • February

    Mississippi River Lock and Dam 1, Ambursen Dam Downstream Repair

    The purpose of this project is to re-establish armor downstream of the concrete apron and prevent further scour. Lock and Dam 1 is located on the Minneapolis, Minnesota side of the Mississippi River.
  • October

    Mississippi River Lock and Dam 5A Embankment and Levee Certification

    The Lock and Dam 5A embankment is located along the Mississippi River about 3.5 river miles above Winona, Minnesota, and about 3 river miles below Fountain City, Wis. FEMA is verifying that all levees recognized as providing protection from the base flood meet the requirements outlined in 44 CFR 65.10. This code requires that specific structural requirements must be certified by a registered professional engineer or a federal agency with responsibility for levee design. The city of Winona is performing this certification for the flood risk management project with the Corps providing an analysis of the Lock and Dam 5A embankment in support of that certification.
  • March

    Mississippi River Lock and Dam 6, Guidewall End Cell

    The purpose of this project is to extend the longevity of the guidewalls at each of our locks and dams and to reduce operability issues and required maintenance. An end cell would provide adequate protection of the end monolith along the guidewalls, while the past crib grouting component will add stability. Lock and Dams 2 through 10, which are located from Hastings, Minnesota, to Guttenberg, Iowa.
  • February

    Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2–10 Embankment Rehabilitation Adjacent to Structures

    Embankment rehabilitation will address restoring embankments to meet current design standards. Overtopping protection adjacent to concrete structures is the first priority for design and construction. No increase in the height of the embankments is planned. Upper Mississippi Locks and Dams 2 through 10.
  • October

    Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2–10 Guidewall Crib Repairs

    Guidewalls are integral to each of the Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2 through 10. Guidewalls are long extensions of the lock walls, in either the upstream or downstream direction, that are parallel to the lock wall. These walls serve primarily to guide the long tows into the lock and to provide mooring facilities for tows too long to be accommodated in a single lockage. The guidewalls are constructed of multiple 35 to 40 feet length concrete monoliths with rock filled timber cribs beneath and behind them.
  • September

    Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2–10 Miter Gates Replacement

    Locks and Dams (LD) 2 through 10 have used the same miter gates since their construction in the 1930s. Over time, the gates have been damaged and distressed, which has led to serviceability and safety issues. This project will replace the gates and the anchorages system, increasing navigational longevity and operational readiness while decreasing repair costs and downtime due to maintenance or failure. Upper Mississippi Locks and Dams 2 through 10.
  • March

    Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2–10 Non-Structural Embankment Repair

    The non-structural embankment repair projects at Locks and Dams (LD) 2 through 10 will address restoring embankments to meet current design standards. Most dam embankments are currently protected from the erosive forces of water by a layer of riprap placed along the embankment’s length. When the riprap eventually erodes, the embankment itself will erode if more protection is not added. Upper Mississippi Locks and Dams 2 through 10.
  • Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2–10 Tow Rail System

    The tow rail system is integral to the operation of each of the Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2 through 10. It is attached to the top of the lock guidewall and helps guide tows through the lock chamber. Each system is comprised of an operating unit, rail and traveling kevel or “mule.” The Locks and Dams 2 through 10 tow rail systems have been deteriorating over the past several years, requiring rehabilitation of these systems.
  • February

    Mississippi River Recreation and Environmental Stewardship

    Although navigation was the initial purpose of Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Navigation Project, Congress has since authorized the development of recreational facilities, protection of forest resources, and required the consideration of fish and wildlife conservation.
  • March

    Pokegama Dam Slurry Trench Project, Grand Rapids, Minn.

    Pokegama Dam was constructed in 1884. The main embankment was constructed with a pervious, rock and clay-filled timber structure core and covered with sandy material. In 1941, a sheetpile wall was installed upstream of the timber core to minimize unwanted seepage (flow) through the embankment. The existing sheetpile wall has been effective at controlling seepage, but its overall condition is currently in question. Without an effective seepage barrier, the water levels could rise throughout the embankment causing downstream slope instability, which would threaten the integrity of the dam.
  • Pool 2 Dredged Material Management Plan – Hennepin, Ramsey, Dakota and Washington Counties, Minnesota

    The purpose of the Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) is to prepare a coordinated long-term plan for managing dredged material in Pool 2. This plan was initiated due to increases in dredging volumes throughout Pool 2. Furthermore, three temporary dredged material placement sites need to be excavated in Lower Pool 2.
  • Pool 6 Dredged Material Management Plan – Winona County, Minnesota; Buffalo and Trempealeau Counties, Wisconsin

    The purpose of the Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) is to prepare a coordinated long-term plan for managing dredged material from Pool 6. The Pool 6 DMMP study area is located between Lock and Dam 5A at river mile 728.5 and Lock and Dam 6 at river mile 714.1. The study area borders the city of Winona, Minnesota, at the upstream end and extends downstream of the village of Trempealeau, Wisconsin.
  • Pool 9 Dredged Material Management Plan – Houston County, Minnesota, Allamakee County, Iowa, and Vernon County, Wisconsin

    The purpose of the DMMP is to prepare a coordinated long-term plan for managing dredged material in Pool 9. This plan was initiated due to needs for dredged material management upland placement sites, especially in the upstream reach of the pool. The Pool 9 Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) study area is located between Lock and Dam 8 at Genoa, Wisconsin, and Lock and Dam 9 near Lynxville, Wisconsin, spanning more than 31 river miles from 679.2 to 648.0. The study area includes several communities near the main navigation channel including Lansing, Iowa, and De Soto, Wisconsin.
  • October

    Small-Boat Harbor Dredging, St. Paul, Minnesota

    The St. Paul Small-Boat Harbor is on the lower end of Harriet Island in St. Paul, Minnesota, at Upper Mississippi River mile 839.6 on the right descending bank. The length of the harbor is 2,375 feet; the width varies from 200 to 400 feet. The Corps of Engineers is authorized to maintain the harbor to a depth of 5.0 feet below low control pool elevation of 687.2 feet mean sea level (msl). The city of St. Paul is the non-federal sponsor for the project and is required to furnish a suitable placement site for the dredged material.
  • March

    Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program: Reno Bottoms, Pool 9, Upper Mississippi River

    The primary objective of this project is to protect, restore, or create resilient and diverse bottomland forests. The quality and extent of the unique forest and aquatic habitat in the Reno Bottoms project area has been declining over the past several decades. Human caused changes in hydrology, land use, and climate have increased water levels within the project area. Without action, the project area will continue to degrade. The quality of forest and aquatic habitat will decrease. Invasive grasses would expand into forests, limiting opportunities for smaller trees to grow and reducing habitat value. Additional loss of wetland habitat would adversely affect migrating waterbirds and songbirds who require the floodplain forest to stop and rest.
  • Upper St. Anthony Falls Tainter Gate Rehabilitation

    The Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam is part of the Inland Waterway Navigation System of the Upper Mississippi River Basin. The Tainter gate’s electrical control system has not been upgraded for many decades. Attempts to operate the gate have failed on various occasions and reliability is a concern. There is also question over the condition of the system’s hydraulics because the ram cylinder rooms and operating machinery rooms are constantly wet.