• February

    Red River of the North Comprehensive Watershed Management Plan

    The Red River of the North basin is an international, multi-jurisdictional watershed of 45,000 square miles, with 80 percent of the basin lying in the United States and 20 percent in Manitoba, Canada. Eighteen Minnesota counties and 22 North Dakota counties lie wholly or partially in the basin. The river flows to the north, bringing water and nutrients to Lake Winnipeg in Manitoba. Flooding and loss of native habitat are significant issues in the Red River basin.
  • October

    Small-Boat Harbor Dredging, St. Paul, Minnesota

    The St. Paul Small-Boat Harbor is on the lower end of Harriet Island in St. Paul, Minnesota, at Upper Mississippi River mile 839.6 on the right descending bank. The length of the harbor is 2,375 feet; the width varies from 200 to 400 feet. The Corps of Engineers is authorized to maintain the harbor to a depth of 5.0 feet below low control pool elevation of 687.2 feet mean sea level (msl). The city of St. Paul is the non-federal sponsor for the project and is required to furnish a suitable placement site for the dredged material.
  • February

    Souris Basin Section 408

    Following the 2011 flood event, North Dakota developed a preliminary engineering report that evaluated alternatives to mitigate flood risks throughout the Souris Basin. The report recommended a flood risk management project that would provide protection up to the 2011 flood of record levels or approximately 27,400 cubic feet per second.
  • Souris Court Levee Repair, Minot, ND

    The Souris River flows from Saskatchewan, Canada into North Dakota and then back into Canada. Minot is a city located in north central North Dakota with a population of approximately 46,000 residents. Above normal precipitation during the summer and fall of 2010 left much of the eastern portion of Saskatchewan saturated. The winter of 2010 and 2011 then saw snowfall significantly above normal throughout the basin. The Souris River in the Minot area started to rise in April 2011 and continued to rise throughout May 2011.
  • Souris River Basin, North Dakota

    In the mid-1970s, a series of major flood events occurred. To protect the communities, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers constructed a series of emergency levees under Public Law 84‒99. These levees were later incorporated into the federal project. Since then, the emergency levees have undergone limited maintenance and experienced structural encroachments; however, these levees remain the primary line of defense for major flood events. While the emergency levees have provided some protection against major flood events, a permanent solution is needed to reduce the flood risk to these critical North Dakota communities. The Souris River in the North Dakota cities of Burlington, Minot, Logan, and Sawyer had a flood of record in 2011 with flows of 27,400 cubic feet per second. These flows devastated the communities and caused evacuations of more than 11,000 residents and approximately $1 billion in damage to private and public property.
  • Souris River Hydrology and Hydraulics Studies

    The Souris (Mouse) River is located in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada, and North Dakota. The headwaters of the basin comprise several rivers in Saskatchewan that meet near the international border and flow into North Dakota. The Des Lacs River joins the Souris upstream of Minot near Burlington, North Dakota. The Souris River then flows through Sawyer and Velva, North Dakota, before turning back to the north and flowing into Manitoba.
  • St. Croix River Feasibility Study: Endangered Mussel Conservation

    Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) in the Upper Mississippi River are a significant threat to the endangered Higgins eye pearlymussel (Lampsilis higginsii) and winged mapleleaf (Quadrula fragosa). The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District and Engineer Research and Development Center are conducting a study in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; the National Park Service; the Departments of Natural Resources from Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa; and the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission. Recommended management alternatives outside the Corps’ existing authorities would need to be implemented by others.
  • St. Croix River Project Channel Maintenance

    The St. Paul District is authorized to maintain a 9-foot navigation channel on the St. Croix River from the mouth at the confluence with the Mississippi River near Prescott, Wisconsin, to river mile 24.5 near Stillwater, Minnesota. The authorized width is 200 feet. A 3-foot channel is authorized from river mile 24.5 to river mile 51.8 near Taylors Falls, Minnesota. The authorized width for this reach is 25 feet, and the controlling depth is 1 foot at extreme low water.
  • September

    Tribal Partnership Program

    The Tribal Partnership Program (TPP) provides authority for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to utilize TPP to perform water-related planning activities and activities related to the study, design and construction of water resources development projects located primarily on tribal lands that substantially benefit federally-recognized tribes. To start the process, a tribe submits a study request to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The Corps evaluates the request, and if viable, the Corps works with the tribe to determine a scope of work and enters into a feasibility cost sharing agreement (FCSA). Following the execution of the FCSA, the Corps seeks federal funding for the study.
  • October

    Tribal Partnership Program (TPP): Lac Courte Oreilles Muskellunge Spawning Habitat Restoration

    Located in Sawyer County, Wisconsin, Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) is a series of lakes that was once a highly productive wild rice water with copious amounts of fish. Within LCO, Musky Bay produced the most wild rice and served as the primary spawning habitat for muskellunge, which are native to LCO. The lake has been known for producing trophy-size fish, including a world record. Presently, due to eutrophication, the wild rice has almost completely disappeared and fish are disappearing within the boundaries of the LCO Reservation. Eutrophication, which occurs when a body of water becomes overly enriched with nutrients, has caused a dense growth of undesirable plant life and fish kills.
  • September

    Tribal Partnership Program: Hydrogeologic Study and Groundwater Flow Model with Scenarios of the Shell Valley Aquifer, Turtle Mountain Reservation, ND

    The Tribal population within the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation relies on groundwater, mainly the Shell Valley Aquifer, as their source of water. In November 2019, the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indian (TMBCI) requested assistance to provide scientific information needed for managing tribal community groundwater resources and to better understand potential contaminate flow paths.
  • November

    Tribal Partnership Program: Lower Sioux Indian Community

    The study will assess the problems and opportunities being faced by the Lower Sioux Indian Community on their tribal lands and make recommendations related to erosion along the Minnesota River adjacent to and impacting those lands. The Lower Sioux Indian Community is located south of the Minnesota River in Redwood County, approximately 2 miles south of the city of Morton, Minnesota.
  • September

    Tribal Partnership Program: Red Lake Fish Passage & Wetland Restoration, Red Lake River, Minnesota

    The study will address the degradation of culturally significant habitat being faced by the Red Lake Nation on their tribal lands along the Red Lake River and the Zah Gheeng Marsh. The study will assess and make recommendations related to fish passage through a low-head dam and wetland restoration opportunities along the Red Lake River.
  • October

    Tribal Partnership Program: Section 203, Big Sand Lake Shoreline Stabilization

    The purpose of the project is to arrest erosion along tribal lands on the southeast side of the lake while enhancing access to the water for cultural practices. Fed by groundwater, Big Sand Lake is a clear, soft water lake that has varying levels of algae growth within the year, affecting lake health. The lake, located in Burnett County, Wisconsin, is typically 1,434 surface acres with a maximum depth of 55 feet.
  • Tribal Partnership Program: Section 203, Little Minnesota River Assessment of Fish Migration

    Fish migration up the Little Minnesota River has ceased, which is of great concern to the Sisseton band of the Dakota. This study aims to determine the cause of the lack of migration and identify potential solutions. The study area for this project is the Little Minnesota River between Big Stone Lake and the Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Lake Traverse Reservation, which is approximately 200 miles northwest of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and 158 miles north of Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The primary area of concern is located in Roberts County, South Dakota, and just outside of Browns Valley, Minnesota, in Traverse County and Big Stone County, Minnesota.
  • March

    Tribal Partnership Program: Sturgeon Lake

    The purpose of the project is to address sedimentation, erosion and degradation of culturally significant habitat on Prairie Island Indian Community’s tribal land in Sturgeon Lake. Priority objectives identified in the feasibility study, which will be carried forward in the design and implementation phase are to: (1) reduce shoreline erosion on the Buffalo Slough Island; and (2) improve/restore floodplain forest habitat on Buffalo Slough Island.
  • April

    Tribal Partnership Program: Upper Sioux Community, Minnesota River

    The study will assess the problems and opportunities being faced by the Upper Sioux Community on their tribal lands and make recommendations related to erosion along the Minnesota River adjacent to and impacting those lands. The Upper Sioux Community is located south of the Minnesota River in Yellow Medicine County, approximately four miles south of the city of Granite Falls, Minnesota.
  • December

    Upper Mississippi River - Illinois Waterway System Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability Program (NESP)

    Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability Program (NESP) is a long-term program of ecosystem restoration and navigation improvements for the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS). NESP will improve system capacity and reduce commercial traffic delays through construction of seven new 1,200-foot locks, mooring cells, and switchboat implementation.
  • April

    Upper Mississippi River – Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability Program (NESP) Johnson Island Project

    This is a NESP study partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WIDNR) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The study will consider alternatives including island building and enhancement, forest enhancement and creation, backwater restoration and dredging, island and shoreline protection and beneficial use of dredged material.
  • Upper Mississippi River – Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability Program (NESP) Systemic Mitigation Island 4 Project

    Sedimentation and sediment resuspension caused a loss in water depth diversity of the backwater lakes and isolated wetlands above Lake Pepin as well as a loss in aquatic vegetation. Concerns over habitat deficiencies in Upper Pool 4 include reduced habitat diversity and quality, lack of aquatic vegetation and invertebrates, and reduced abundance of fish and wildlife. The project includes construction of a peninsula to improve habitat conditions by reducing wind, waves, and redirecting sediment inflows. It also includes overwintering dredging to support a deep water habitat for fish and bank and shoreline stabilization to reduce inflows and erosion during high flow events.
  • Upper Mississippi River – Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability Program (NESP) Wacouta Bay Project

    This is a NESP study partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WIDNR), Minnesota Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The study will consider alternatives including island building and enhancement, forest enhancement and creation, backwater restoration and dredging, island and shoreline protection and beneficial use of dredged material.
  • Upper Mississippi River – Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability Program Sny Magill Project

    This NESP study is a partnership with the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Iowa Dept of Natural Resources, Wisconsin Dept of Natural Resources and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The study will consider alternatives including riverbank stabilization and protection, floodplain restoration, closure or partial closure structures, and in-channel diversion structures.
  • February

    Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Navigation Project Locks and Dams, Minnesota/Wisconsin/Iowa

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District is responsible for maintaining 244 miles of the Upper Mississippi River 9-foot channel navigation system from Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Guttenberg, Iowa. The Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Navigation Project is located in or contiguous to Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa. The navigation project within the St. Paul District includes 13 locks and dams that are operated and maintained by the Corps. In addition to the locks and dams, the project includes channel maintenance, recreation and natural resource activities.
  • Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Navigation Project Maintenance Minnesota/Wisconsin/Iowa

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is responsible for maintaining a 9-foot navigation channel as an important component to the inland navigation system. The St. Paul District (MVP) is responsible for maintaining 244 miles of the Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Navigation Project from the head of navigation at Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Guttenberg, Iowa. The navigation project also includes the lower navigable portions of the Minnesota, St. Croix, and Black Rivers.
  • April

    Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program: Lake Winneshiek

    Lake Winneshiek is a 6,000 acre backwater lake on the Wisconsin side of the Mississippi River navigation channel in lower Pool 9 about 4 miles downstream from Lansing, Iowa. The proposed project would create two islands, each about 8,000 feet long, in the center of Lake Winneshiek to reduce wave action in this large, open water area. If suitable construction material can be found in the backwater area, dredging would provide up to 20 acres of additional deepwater habitat.
  • Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program: Lower Pool 10 Islands, Guttenberg, Iowa Habitat Restoration

    The Lower Pool 10 Islands are part of the Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) Program. The site is a 1,000-acre side channel and island complex located on the Iowa side of the Mississippi River navigation channel in Pool 10, about one mile upstream from Lock and Dam 10 in Guttenberg, Iowa. The site lies within the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge.
  • Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program: McGregor Lake, Prairie Du Chien, Wisconsin Habitat Restoration

    McGregor Lake is a 200-acre backwater lake in Pool 10 of the Mississippi River. The McGregor Lake project is located on the Wisconsin side of the Upper Mississippi River in the middle of Pool 10, near Prairie Du Chien, Wisconsin. The site lies within the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge.
  • March

    Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program: Minnesota/Wisconsin/Iowa Habitat Restoration

    This program, authorized by Congress in 1986, emphasizes habitat rehabilitation and enhancement projects (HREPs) and long-term resource monitoring. The HREP component includes dredging backwater areas and channels, constructing dikes, creating and stabilizing islands, controlling side channel flows and water levels, and creating floodplain forest habitat.
  • Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program: Reno Bottoms, Pool 9, Upper Mississippi River

    The primary objective of this project is to protect, restore, or create resilient and diverse bottomland forests. The quality and extent of the unique forest and aquatic habitat in the Reno Bottoms project area has been declining over the past several decades. Human caused changes in hydrology, land use, and climate have increased water levels within the project area. Without action, the project area will continue to degrade. The quality of forest and aquatic habitat will decrease. Invasive grasses would expand into forests, limiting opportunities for smaller trees to grow and reducing habitat value. Additional loss of wetland habitat would adversely affect migrating waterbirds and songbirds who require the floodplain forest to stop and rest.
  • April

    Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program: Robinson Lake, Pool 4, Minnesota - Habitat Restoration

    The proposed project goal is to maintain, enhance, and create habitat suitable for native and desirable, aquatic and terrestrial plants and animals. The Robinson Lake area has lost bathymetric diversity, floodplain forest patch size, connectivity, and interior forest habitat over time. Island creation/enhancement and dredging would be the primary tools used to counter-act the losses. Increasing wild celery beds and perennial emergent vegetation would also be a goal within the lake to increase opportunities for migratory waterfowl. The project seeks to protect, enhance, restore, or create backwater and flowing channel habitats that provide diverse flow conditions and sediment dynamics that will benefit native fish (including migratory species) and mussel populations. The project seeks to protect and enhance diverse bottomland forest that will benefit migratory and resident birds and other species. The project also seeks to maintain or increase quantity and diversity of submerged, emergent, and rooted floating leaved vegetation.
  • Upper Mississippi River Restoration Project Big Lake, Pool 4, Wisconsin

    As with the much of the upper Mississippi River, sedimentation of backwater areas is an ongoing issue. The project area is greatly influenced by the input of sand from the Chippewa River that enters Pool 4 at about river mile 764. Other potential sources of sand are the historic channel maintenance dredging side-cast islands and the four active temporary placement sites within the study area. Big Lake has lost much of its island complex and bottomland forest to wind and wave erosion. The barrier islands between the lake and Catfish Slough have been degraded and/or eliminated over the past several years.
  • March

    Upper St. Anthony Falls Tainter Gate Rehabilitation

    The Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam is part of the Inland Waterway Navigation System of the Upper Mississippi River Basin. The Tainter gate’s electrical control system has not been upgraded for many decades. Attempts to operate the gate have failed on various occasions and reliability is a concern. There is also question over the condition of the system’s hydraulics because the ram cylinder rooms and operating machinery rooms are constantly wet.