US Army Corps of Engineers
St. Paul District

Wisconsin projects, studies and information papers

Continuing Authorities Program (CAP)

Under the Continuing Authorities Program (CAP), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is authorized to plan, design and construct certain types of water resource and ecosystem restoration projects without additional and specific congressional authorization. The purpose is to implement projects of limited scope and complexity. Each authority has specific guidelines and total program and per-project funding limits. Studies are cost-shared 50/50 during feasibility. Most projects are cost-shared 65 percent Federal and 35 percent non-Federal during implementation, unless otherwise noted.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Beneficial Use of Dredged Material, Section 204, Upper Pool 4 – Lake Pepin

Lake Pepin extends about 22 miles in length from the delta of the Chippewa River to approximately River Mile 787 which is about 3 miles downstream of Red Wing, Minnesota. Upper Lake Pepin consists of channel border islands and backwater lakes grading into an expansive, shallow open water area with little physical structure. Sedimentation and sediment resuspension have caused a loss in water depth diversity of the backwater lakes and isolated wetlands above Lake Pepin as well as a loss in aquatic vegetation.
Published: 9/16/2016

Continuing Authorities Program: Emergency Streambank Protection – Section 14, Waste Water Treatment Lagoons, Village of Colfax, Wisconsin

The Village of Colfax is located in Dunn County, Wisconsin, approximately 75 miles east of St. Paul, Minnesota. The erosion site is located on the left descending bank of the Red Cedar River, less than one mile downstream of Colfax, at the Village of Colfax Waste Water Treatment Lagoons. Erosion has cut the bank to within 50 feet of the waste water treatment lagoon berm which threatens the integrity of the berm. Severe safety and environmental impacts would occur if erosion continues at this location and waste water from the lagoons was to enter the Red Cedar River.
Published: 10/2/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Emergency Streambank Protection, Section 14, Dunn County Highway M

An area of County Highway M along the east bank of the Red Cedar River northeast of Colfax, Wisconsin is being threatened by erosion. The erosion is occurring along the outside bend of the river. Based on surveys, a stretch of river bank that is approximately 500 feet long is actively eroding where the top of bank has encroached on the right of way for County Highway M. Currently the top of bank is within 10-15 feet of the shoulder at the center of the site. Further erosion would lead to a significant safety concern as the bank drops off approximately 50 feet to the water surface below.
Published: 9/12/2016

Continuing Authorities Program: Flood Risk Management – Section 205, Trempealeau River, Arcadia, Wisconsin

Arcadia is located in Trempealeau County in west-central Wisconsin, approximately 130 miles southeast of St. Paul, Minnesota. The city is located on the Trempealeau River with Turton Creek and Meyers Valley Creek flowing through town. The area is subject to flooding from the river, as well as from both creeks. The part of town located south of the Trempealeau River is affected by flooding, which includes Ashley Furniture Industries corporate headquarters and manufacturing facility.
Published: 2/26/2015

Dam Bridge & Gate Painting – Lower St. Anthony Falls through Lock and Dam 10

The St. Paul District operates and maintains 13 locks and dams from Upper St. Anthony Falls in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Lock and Dam 10 in Guttenberg, Iowa. Each lock and dam is a critical step in the "stairway of water" that makes navigation possible between Minneapolis and St. Louis, Missouri. These facilities are aging structures, with locks and dams 2 through 10 originally constructed in the 1930s. These sites include a dam bridge and varying numbers of dam gates. The moveable dam gates are one of the most critical system components because they control pool elevation for navigation, flood control and environmental purposes.
Published: 2/26/2015

Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP): Lower Pool 4

The Lower Pool 4 Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) study area is located between Lock and Dam 4 and the foot of Lake Pepin, river miles 753.0 to 764.0. The purpose of the DMMP is to prepare, a coordinated long-term plan for managing dredged material in Lower Pool 4 of the Upper Mississippi River for the purposes of continued operation and maintenance of the Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Navigation Channel Project.
Published: 3/15/2018

Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP): Pool 5

The Pool 5 Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) study area is located between Lock and Dam 4 at Alma, Wisconsin, and Lock and Dam 5 near Minneiska, Minnesota, spanning nearly 15 river miles from 752.8 to 738.1. The purpose of the DMMP is to prepare a coordinated long-term plan for managing dredged material in Lower Pool 5 of the Upper Mississippi River for the purposes of continued operation and maintenance of the Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Navigation Project.
Published: 3/15/2018

Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP): Pool 6

The Pool 6 Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) study area is located between Lock and Dam 5A at river mile 728.5 and Lock and Dam 6 at river mile 714.1. The purpose of the DMMP is to prepare a coordinated long-term plan for managing dredged material in Pool 6 of the Upper Mississippi River for the purposes of continued operation and maintenance of the Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Navigation Project.
Published: 3/15/2018

Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP): Pool 9

The Pool 9 Dredged Material Management Plan (DMMP) study area is located between Lock and Dam 8 at Genoa, Wisconins, and Lock and Dam 9 near Lynxville, Wisconsin, spanning more than 31 river miles from 679.2 to 648.0. The purpose of the DMMP is to prepare, a coordinated long-term plan for managing dredged material in Pool 9 of the Upper Mississippi River for the purposes of continued operation and maintenance of the Upper Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Navigation Project.
Published: 3/15/2018

Eau Galle Lake, Spring Valley, Wisconsin

Eau Galle Lake is located on the Eau Galle River just outside Spring Valley, Wisconsin, approximately 50 miles east of the Twin Cities in Minnesota. The project is composed of a large earthen embankment, an uncontrolled morning glory control structure and outlet works, overnight camping areas, a beach, picnic areas, a boat launch for non-motorized vessels only, hiking and equestrian trails and scenic overlooks.
Published: 2/26/2015

Environmental Infrastructure Assistance: Section 154, Northern Wisconsin

The Section 154 program encompasses Ashland, Bayfield, Douglas, and Iron Counties, Wisconsin. Program responsibilities are shared between the St. Paul and the Detroit Districts. It authorizes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide assistance to northern Wisconsin public entities in the form of design, construction and reconstruction assistance for: water-related environmental infrastructure; resource protection and development projects, including navigation and inland harbor improvement and expansion; wastewater treatment and related facilities; water supply and related facilities; environmental restoration and surface water resource protection and development.
Published: 10/2/2015

Flood Plain Management Services: Wisconsin

The Flood Plain Management Services program is authorized by Section 206 of the 1960 Flood Control Act, Public Law 86-645, as amended. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers developed the Flood Plain Management Services program specifically to address the needs of people who live and work in floodplain. This is a program to educate these individuals on flood hazards, and the actions they can take to reduce property damage and prevent the loss of life. The program’s objective is to foster public understanding of the options for dealing with flood hazards and to promote prudent use and management of the nation’s floodplains.
Published: 3/16/2017

Flood Risk Management: Silver Jackets (WI)

Silver Jackets teams are collaborative State-led interagency teams, continuously working together to reduce flood risk at the State level. Through the Silver Jackets program, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, additional Federal, State and sometimes local and tribal agencies provide a unified approach to addressing a State’s priorities. Often, no single agency has the complete solution, but each may have one or more pieces to contribute.
Published: 2/27/2015

Hydropower, FERC Licensing

Granting licenses for private hydropower development at Federal facilities falls within the purview of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). Private hydropower facilities currently in operation at St. Paul District sites include Xcel Energy at Upper St. Anthony Falls, SAF Hydropower at Lower St. Anthony Falls, Twin Cities Hydropower (Ford Hydropower) at Lock and Dam 1 and the city of Hastings Hydropower at Lock and Dam 2.
Published: 2/26/2015

Levee Safety Program (Wisconsin)

The basic objectives of the Levee Safety Program are to develop balanced and informed assessments of levees within the program; evaluate, prioritize and justify levee safety decisions; and recommend improvements to public safety associated with levee systems. The Corps created the National Levee Database, inventoried all levees in the program and improved inspection procedures.
Published: 2/26/2015

Levee System Evaluations for the National Flood Insurance Program

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) agency-wide process for completion of levee system evaluations in support of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) as administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). FEMA administers the NFIP program, which focuses on the 1-percent annual chance exceedance flood, also, referred to as the 100-year or base flood. The FEMA 100-year flood is a flood insurance standard, not a public safety standard.
Published: 2/26/2015

Mississippi River 9-Foot Project Channel Maintenance

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District is responsible for maintaining 244 miles of the Upper Mississippi River 9-foot channel navigation system from the head of navigation at Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Guttenberg, Iowa. The navigation system also includes the lower navigable portions of the Minnesota, St. Croix, and Black Rivers.
Published: 2/26/2015

Mississippi River 9-Foot Project, Locks and Dams

The St. Paul District is responsible for maintaining 244 miles of the Upper Mississippi River 9-foot channel navigation system from the head of navigation in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Guttenberg, Iowa. The project is located in or contiguous to Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa. The navigation project within the St. Paul District includes 13 sets of locks and dams that are operated and maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In addition to the locks and dams the project includes channel maintenance, recreation and natural resource activities.
Published: 2/27/2015

Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2–10 Embankment Rehabilitation Adjacent to Structures

Earthfill embankments are integral to each of the Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2 through 10. The purpose of this project is to reestablish and armor degraded embankments to prevent further erosion and potential failure during high water events. The existing rock protection is well past its intended design life and does not perform satisfactorily. Wave action from high water causes continued widespread erosion.
Published: 2/26/2015

Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2–10 Guidewall Crib Repairs

Guidewalls are integral to each of the Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2 through 10. Guidewalls are long extensions of the lock walls, in either the upstream or downstream direction, that are parallel to the lock wall. These walls serve primarily to guide the long tows into the lock and to provide mooring facilities for tows too long to be accommodated in a single lockage. The guidewalls are constructed of multiple 35 to 40 feet length concrete monoliths with rock filled timber cribs beneath and behind them.
Published: 10/2/2015

Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2–10 Guidewall End Cell

Guidewalls are integral to each of the Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2 through 10. Guidewalls are long extensions of the lock walls, in either the upstream or downstream direction, that are parallel to the lock wall. These walls serve primarily to guide the long tows into the lock and to provide mooring facilities for tows too long to be accommodated in a single lockage.
Published: 3/16/2017

Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2–10 Non-Structural Embankment Repair

Non-structural embankment repair projects at Locks and Dams 2 through 10 will address restoring embankments to meet current design standards. Most dam embankments are currently protected from the erosive forces of water by a layer of riprap placed along the embankment’s length. When the riprap eventually erodes, the embankment itself will erode if more protection is not added. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has designed and placed berms and small islands to assist in reducing wave action and wind fetch within pools created by the locks and dams. Reducing these forces increases the longevity of the embankment protections.
Published: 3/22/2019

Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2–10 Tow Haulage System Repairs

The tow haulage system is integral to the operation of each of the Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2 through 10. It is attached to the top of the lock and dam guidewall and helps guide tows through the lock chamber. The Lock and Dam 2 through 10 tow haulage system has been deteriorating over the past number of years. Two failures at Lock 7 identified the need for a project to address serviceability and safety issues.
Published: 3/14/2016

Mississippi River Locks and Dams 3–10 Sheet Pile Installation at Auxiliary Locks

Lock and Dams 3-10 have a partially completed auxiliary chamber with a single set of miter gates that may be used to pass shallow draft navigation traffic in the event the lock chamber was out of operation and the upstream and downstream pools were equalized. The Auxiliary Miter Gates are considered emergency gates originally intended to allow for limited navigation if the main lock became inoperable. Only one set of miter gates were installed. Since installation, the auxiliary emergency gates have never been used and the gate operating machinery was never installed.
Published: 9/12/2016

Mississippi River Recreation and Environmental Stewardship

The Mississippi River recreation and environmental stewardship functions are headquartered in La Crescent, Minnesota. The organization includes Blackhawk Park, a recreation area located 30 miles south of La Crescent with overnight camping, day-use areas and boat launching facilities. Operation and maintenance of three additional boat accesses at Bad Axe, Millstone and Jay’s Lake Landings are also administered by this organization.
Published: 2/27/2015

Planning Assistance to States (PAS): Mississippi River Water Level Management

In April 2017, the Upper Mississippi River Water Level Management Workshop facilitated discussion about interest and ability in achieving routine, systemic, large-scale water level management – i.e., what that would look like, associated challenges, and recommendations for partnership engagement and action.
Published: 3/15/2018

Planning Assistance to States (PAS): Red Cedar Basin Study

The study, titled “Red Cedar Basin Assessment to Improve Water Quality”, is located in the Red Cedar River Basin, which drains a 1,893 square-mile area in west-central Wisconsin, and includes parts of Barron, Chippewa, Dunn, Polk, Rusk, Sawyer, St. Croix and Washburn Counties.
Published: 3/16/2017

Planning Assistance to States Program

The Planning Assistance to States program, also known as the Section 22 program, is authorized by Section 22 of the Water Resources Development Act, or WRDA, of 1974, as amended. This law provides authority for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to assist states, local governments and other non-federal entities in the preparation of comprehensive plans for the development, use and conservation of water and related land resources. Section 208 of WRDA 1992 amended WRDA 1974 to include eligible Native American Indian tribes as equivalent to a state.
Published: 3/14/2016

Silver and Bighead Carp, Upper Mississippi River

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has the Federal lead on the Asian Carp issue. The Corps’ Great Lakes and Ohio River Division is the Corps lead. The Corps' headquarters is developing an Asian Carp Emergency Response standard operating procedure under the authority of Section 1039 of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act or WRRDA. of 2014 (P.L. 113--121) to prevent Asian carp from getting past the Brandon Road lock and dam on the Ohio River system. This plan is being developed in coordination with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee. The plan includes rapid response protocols, monitoring, and other countermeasures. This will likely be extended to other river systems.
Published: 9/12/2016

St. Croix River Feasibility Study: Endangered Mussel Conservation

Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) in the Upper Mississippi River are a significant threat to the endangered Higgins eye pearlymussel (Lampsilis higginsii) and winged mapleleaf (Quadrula fragosa). The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District and Engineer Research and Development Center are conducting a study in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; the National Park Service; the Departments of Natural Resources from Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa; and the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission. Recommended management alternatives outside the Corps’ existing authorities would need to be implemented by others.
Published: 2/27/2015

St. Croix River Project Channel Maintenance

The St. Paul District is authorized to maintain a 9-foot navigation channel on the St. Croix River from the mouth at the confluence with the Mississippi River near Prescott, Wisconsin, to river mile 24.5 near Stillwater, Minnesota. The authorized width is 200 feet. A 3-foot channel is authorized from river mile 24.5 to river mile 51.8 near Taylors Falls, Minnesota. The authorized width for this reach is 25 feet, and the controlling depth is 1 foot at extreme low water.
Published: 2/27/2015

Tribal Partnership Program

The Tribal Partnership Program is authorized by Section 203 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2000. The Tribal Partnership Program provides authority for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in cooperation with Indian nations to study and determine the feasibility of carrying out projects that will substantially benefit Indian nations. Activity may address (A) projects for flood damage reduction, environmental restoration and protection and preservation of cultural and natural resources; (B) watershed assessments and planning activities; and (C) such other projects as the Corps, in cooperation with Indian tribes and the heads of other federal agencies, determines to be appropriate.
Published: 9/25/2017

Tribal Partnership Program (TPP): Big Sand Lake Shoreline Restoration

Fed by groundwater, Big Sand Lake is a clear, soft water lake that has varying levels of algae growth within the year, affecting lake health. The lake, located in Burnett County, Wisconsin, is typically 1,434 surface acres with a maximum depth of 55 feet. Tribal elders have indicated that these areas were good ricing spots historically but have decreased in size over time. No harvests have occurred for many years. Additionally, approximately 2,000 lineal feet of shoreline is actively eroding into tribal land along the south eastern bank of Big Sand Lake.
Published: 10/1/2018

Tribal Partnership Program (TPP): Lac Courte Oreilles Muskellunge Spawning Habitat Restoration

Located in Sawyer County, Wisconsin, Lac Courte Oreilles (LCO) is a series of lakes that was once a highly productive wild rice water with copious amounts of fish. Within LCO, Musky Bay produced the most wild rice and served as the primary spawning habitat for muskellunge, which are native to LCO. The lake has been known for producing trophy-size fish, including a world record. Presently, due to eutrophication, the wild rice has almost completely disappeared and fish are disappearing within the boundaries of the LCO Reservation. Eutrophication, which occurs when a body of water becomes overly enriched with nutrients, has caused a dense growth of undesirable plant life and fish kills.
Published: 10/1/2018

Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program includes studies and projects in the Upper Mississippi River system north of Cairo, Illinois. The system includes the Illinois River. This program, authorized by Congress in 1986, emphasizes habitat rehabilitation and enhancement projects and long-term resource monitoring. The habitat project component includes dredging backwater areas and channels, constructing dikes, creating and stabilizing islands and controlling side channel flows and water levels.
Published: 3/20/2017