US Army Corps of Engineers
St. Paul District

Souris River basin projects, studies and information papers

Feasibility Study: Souris River Basin

The Souris River in the North Dakota cities of Burlington, Minot, Logan, and Sawyer had a flood of record in 2011 with flows of 27,000 cubic feet per second. These flows devastated the communities and caused evacuations of more than 10,000 residents and millions of dollars in damage to private and public property. In the mid-1970s, a series of major flood events occurred. To protect the communities, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers constructed a series of Public Law 84-99 emergency levees, which were later incorporated into the Federal project.
Published: 2/27/2015

Flood Control Sites (ND): Lake Ashtabula, Homme Lake, Souris River

Project locations: Homme Lake, two miles west of Park River, North Dakota, on the South Branch of the Park River; Lake Ashtabula (Baldhill Dam), 12 miles northwest of Valley City, North Dakota, on the Sheyenne River; Lake Darling, operated by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, approximately 20 miles northwest and J. Clark Salyer Wildlife Refuge, is 65 miles northeast of Minot, North Dakota.
Published: 2/27/2015

Planning Assistance to States (PAS): Souris Basin Study

Unprecedented flooding in the Souris River Basin in 2011 has focused attention on review of the water control structure operating plan during flood events. This study area will include the entire Souris River Basin to its confluence with the Assiniboine River and will encompass the key water control reservoirs: Rafferty, Alameda, Boundary and Lake Darling. The study will look at the geographical limits of the basin in the provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba and the state of North Dakota.
Published: 9/25/2017

Souris Basin Section 408 Permission: Alteration to Existing Federal Project

The Souris River flows from Saskatchewan, Canada, into North Dakota and then back into Canada. The Souris River in the North Dakota cities of Burlington, Minot, Logan, and Sawyer had a flood of record in 2011 with flows of 27,000 cubic feet per second. These flows devastated the communities and caused evacuations of more than 10,000 residents and millions of dollars in damage to private and public property.
Published: 2/26/2015