US Army Corps of Engineers
St. Paul District

Minnesota Congressional District 5 projects and studies

Continuing Authorities Program (CAP)

Under the Continuing Authorities Program (CAP), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is authorized to plan, design and construct certain types of water resource and ecosystem restoration projects without additional and specific congressional authorization. The purpose is to implement projects of limited scope and complexity. Each authority has specific guidelines and total program and per-project funding limits. Studies are cost-shared 50/50 during feasibility. Most projects are cost-shared 65 percent Federal and 35 percent non-Federal during implementation, unless otherwise noted.
Published: 2/26/2015

Dam Bridge & Gate Painting – Lower St. Anthony Falls through Lock and Dam 10

The St. Paul District operates and maintains 13 locks and dams from Upper St. Anthony Falls in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Lock and Dam 10 in Guttenberg, Iowa. Each lock and dam is a critical step in the "stairway of water" that makes navigation possible between Minneapolis and St. Louis, Missouri. These facilities are aging structures, with locks and dams 2 through 10 originally constructed in the 1930s. These sites include a dam bridge and varying numbers of dam gates. The moveable dam gates are one of the most critical system components because they control pool elevation for navigation, flood control and environmental purposes.
Published: 2/26/2015

Disposition Study, Lower St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam, and Lock and Dam 1, Upper Mississippi

A Section 216 study will investigate the appropriate future disposition of Lower St. Anthony Falls (LSAF) Lock and Dam and Lock and Dam 1, located on the Mississippi River in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The LSAF Lock and Dam was constructed as part of the Minneapolis Upper Harbor project in 1956 as authorized by the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1937. Lock and Dam 1 was originally constructed in 1917 and was modified in 1932 under the authority of the River and Harbor Act of 1930. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers operates and maintains the two sites. Both locks have been affected by the decrease in the demand for navigation services stemming from the closure of Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam on June 9, 2015. This disposition study will examine the benefits and costs of continuing to operate LSAF and Lock and Dam 1.
Published: 3/22/2019

Disposition Study, Upper St. Anthony Falls and Lock and Dam, Upper Mississippi River

A Section 216 study will investigate the appropriate future disposition of Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam, or USAF, located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The USAF was constructed as part of the Minneapolis Upper Harbor project in 1963 as authorized by the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1937. Congress closed USAF to navigation on June 9, 2015, under Section 2010 of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continues to operate USAF for flood damage mitigation. The disposition study will examine the benefits and costs of continuing to operate USAF.
Published: 3/14/2016

Hydropower, Crown Hydro, Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued license 11175 to Crown Hydro, LLC, in 1999 which granted it the exclusive rights to develop a hydropower facility in the Mill Ruins Park area on the Mississippi River near Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Crown Hydro Project was originally proposed to be located in the Crown Roller Building and then, later, on Minneapolis park land. Crown Hydro was unable to secure the needed real estate agreements with the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board. In 2013, Crown Hydro made a proposal to locate the project on Corps-managed Government land at Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam. The total 3.4-megawatt estimated capacity would be enough to provide power to more than 2,300 households.
Published: 2/26/2015

Hydropower, FERC Licensing

Granting licenses for private hydropower development at Federal facilities falls within the purview of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). Private hydropower facilities currently in operation at St. Paul District sites include Xcel Energy at Upper St. Anthony Falls, SAF Hydropower at Lower St. Anthony Falls, Twin Cities Hydropower (Ford Hydropower) at Lock and Dam 1 and the city of Hastings Hydropower at Lock and Dam 2.
Published: 2/26/2015

Hydropower, Northern States Power Company, Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam

Northern States Power Company (aka Xcel Energy) holds Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license number 2056, granting it the authority to operate the hydropower facility located at Upper St. Anthony Falls in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Published: 2/26/2015

Hydropower, SAF Hydropower, Lower St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued license number 12451 on Feb. 21, 2006, granting the authority to SAF Hydropower, LLC, to construct and operate a hydropower facility on the Mississippi River at Lower St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The hydropower project includes an 8.98-megawatt generating system composed of a 16-unit turbine matrix, a control building, a transmission line and ancillary facilities. The total capacity of the plant is enough to provide power to 6,200 households.
Published: 2/26/2015

Hydropower, Twin Cities Hydro, Lock and Dam 1

Twin Cities Hydro, LLC, holds Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license number 362, which allows it to operate the Ford Hydropower plant on the Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota. The hydropower facility consists of a powerhouse, four 5,800-horsepower Francis turbines and four 4,880-kilowatt generating units, a 2-foot-high inflatable flashboard system atop the concrete dam spillway and a power distribution system. The total capacity of the plant is 17.92 megawatts, or enough to provide power to 14,500 households.
Published: 2/26/2015

Level of Service Reduction at the Twin Cities Locks and Dams

Constrained funding and the Nation’s fiscal deficit have led to reduced operations and maintenance funding within the Corps Inland Marine Transportation System (IMTS). When coupled with deteriorating infrastructure and increasing costs of operation, it became clear that the level of service the Corps has been providing at some locks and dams is not sustainable.
Published: 2/27/2015

Minnesota River Basin Integrated Watershed Study

The Minnesota River originates in southwestern Minnesota at the Minnesota-South Dakota border. It drains 16,770 square miles in Minnesota, South Dakota, North Dakota and Iowa. It flows 335 miles to join the Mississippi River at Mendota, Minnesota, just south of St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minnesota. The hydrology of the basin has been significantly altered, leading to increased erosion, impaired water quality, substantial sediment and nutrient loads, and degraded aquatic ecosystems in the Minnesota River, Mississippi River, and the Gulf of Mexico.
Published: 2/27/2015

Mississippi River 9-Foot Project Channel Maintenance

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District is responsible for maintaining 244 miles of the Upper Mississippi River 9-foot channel navigation system from the head of navigation at Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Guttenberg, Iowa. The navigation system also includes the lower navigable portions of the Minnesota, St. Croix, and Black Rivers.
Published: 2/26/2015

Mississippi River 9-Foot Project, Locks and Dams

The St. Paul District is responsible for maintaining 244 miles of the Upper Mississippi River 9-foot channel navigation system from the head of navigation in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Guttenberg, Iowa. The project is located in or contiguous to Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa. The navigation project within the St. Paul District includes 13 sets of locks and dams that are operated and maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In addition to the locks and dams the project includes channel maintenance, recreation and natural resource activities.
Published: 2/27/2015

Mississippi River Lock and Dam 1, Ambursen Dam Downstream Repair

Lock and Dam 1 is located on the Minneapolis side of the Mississippi River. The purpose of this project is to re-establish armor downstream of the concrete apron. The existing rock protection consists of grouted derrick stone. This stone bedding has broken up and washed downstream, exposing bedding material and risking failure of the wooden piles and sheet pile located underneath the existing concrete apron.
Published: 2/26/2015

Tribal Partnership Program

The Tribal Partnership Program is authorized by Section 203 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2000. The Tribal Partnership Program provides authority for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in cooperation with Indian nations to study and determine the feasibility of carrying out projects that will substantially benefit Indian nations. Activity may address (A) projects for flood damage reduction, environmental restoration and protection and preservation of cultural and natural resources; (B) watershed assessments and planning activities; and (C) such other projects as the Corps, in cooperation with Indian tribes and the heads of other federal agencies, determines to be appropriate.
Published: 9/25/2017

Upper St. Anthony Falls Tainter Gate Rehabilitation

The Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam is part of the Inland Waterway Navigation System of the Upper Mississippi River Basin. The Tainter gate’s electrical control system has not been upgraded for many decades. Attempts to operate the gate have failed on various occasions and reliability is a concern. There is also question over the condition of the system’s hydraulics because the ram cylinder rooms and operating machinery rooms are constantly wet.
Published: 3/14/2016