US Army Corps of Engineers
St. Paul District

Continuing Authorities Program projects

Continuing Authorities Program (CAP)

Under the Continuing Authorities Program (CAP), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is authorized to plan, design and construct certain types of water resource and ecosystem restoration projects without additional and specific congressional authorization. The purpose is to implement projects of limited scope and complexity. Each authority has specific guidelines and total program and per-project funding limits. Studies are cost-shared 50/50 during feasibility. Most projects are cost-shared 65 percent Federal and 35 percent non-Federal during implementation, unless otherwise noted.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration – Section 1135, Sand Hill River

The study area is located in a rural setting in Polk County, Minnesota, 275 miles northwest of Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Sand Hill River basin is centrally located in the Red River Valley watershed. A major reach of the river downstream of Fertile, Minnesota, was the subject of a flood control project constructed by the Corps of Engineers from 1955 to 1958. It involved straightening the river and constructing several drop structures and served as a drainage improvement to local agriculture. Overall, more than 18 miles of the Sand Hill River was straightened or abandoned.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration – Section 206, Painter Creek

Painter Creek is part of the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District, which includes part of the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and its western and northwestern suburbs. The Painter Creek Watershed has been extensively drained and ditched as a result of increasing demand for agriculture. This caused a loss of wetland and riparian habitat and increased sediment and nutrient loads downstream into Jennings Bay on Lake Minnetonka. Due to the presence of the ditch system, the frequency of which the wetlands are inundated from stream flows has decreased benefits to the habitat and water quality.
Published: 3/14/2016

Continuing Authorities Program: Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration, Section 1135, Lower Otter Tail River

The study area is located in a rural setting in Wilkin County just to the east of Breckenridge, Minnesota, approximately 180 miles northwest of Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Otter Tail River is located in the upper portion of the Red River Valley watershed. A major reach of the river upstream of Breckenridge, Minnesota, was the subject of a flood control project constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the early 1950’s. It involved straightening, cleaning enlarging the river for drainage improvement to local agriculture. The overall length of the river in this reach was reduced from 18 miles to 11 miles as a result of the project. The straightened channel decreased channel length, increased channel grade, increased channel conveyance, increased bank erosion, and reduced the flood profiles in the lower Otter Tail River watershed.
Published: 9/12/2016

Continuing Authorities Program: Beneficial Use of Dredge Material – Section 204, Pig's Eye Lake

Pigs Eye Lake is located in Ramsey County, just east of downtown St. Paul, Minnesota. Pigs Eye Lake is located in upper Pool 2 of the Mississippi River. Due to the lake’s close proximity to the Mississippi River, water level is controlled by the level of the river. The lake is located in the Mississippi River Bottomlands subwatershed.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Beneficial Use of Dredged Material, Section 204, Upper Pool 4 – Lake Pepin

Lake Pepin extends about 22 miles in length from the delta of the Chippewa River to approximately River Mile 787 which is about 3 miles downstream of Red Wing, Minnesota. Upper Lake Pepin consists of channel border islands and backwater lakes grading into an expansive, shallow open water area with little physical structure. Sedimentation and sediment resuspension have caused a loss in water depth diversity of the backwater lakes and isolated wetlands above Lake Pepin as well as a loss in aquatic vegetation.
Published: 9/16/2016

Continuing Authorities Program: Emergency Streambank Protection – Section 14, Crow River

The study area is located in a rural setting in western Hennepin County, Minnesota, approximately 40 miles west of Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Crow River, a tributary to the Mississippi River, was experiencing erosion on a reach north of the city of Delano, Minnesota, where the natural course of the river follows a sharp turn adjacent to County Road 50. Erosion at the outside bend of the channel and at the toe of the bank of the Crow River threatened the stability of County Road 50 at the top of the river bluff.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Emergency Streambank Protection – Section 14, Waste Water Treatment Lagoons, Village of Colfax, Wisconsin

The Village of Colfax is located in Dunn County, Wisconsin, approximately 75 miles east of St. Paul, Minnesota. The erosion site is located on the left descending bank of the Red Cedar River, less than one mile downstream of Colfax, at the Village of Colfax Waste Water Treatment Lagoons. Erosion has cut the bank to within 50 feet of the waste water treatment lagoon berm which threatens the integrity of the berm. Severe safety and environmental impacts would occur if erosion continues at this location and waste water from the lagoons was to enter the Red Cedar River.
Published: 10/2/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Emergency Streambank Protection, Section 14, Dunn County Highway M

An area of County Highway M along the east bank of the Red Cedar River northeast of Colfax, Wisconsin is being threatened by erosion. The erosion is occurring along the outside bend of the river. Based on surveys, a stretch of river bank that is approximately 500 feet long is actively eroding where the top of bank has encroached on the right of way for County Highway M. Currently the top of bank is within 10-15 feet of the shoulder at the center of the site. Further erosion would lead to a significant safety concern as the bank drops off approximately 50 feet to the water surface below.
Published: 9/12/2016

Continuing Authorities Program: Flood Risk Management – Section 205, Minnesota River, Montevideo, Minnesota

Montevideo is located in Chippewa County in western Minnesota, approximately 130 miles west of St. Paul, Minnesota. The city is at the confluence of the Chippewa and Minnesota Rivers. The area is subject to flooding from both rivers. The three areas that are affected include the 1969 levee area, the Smith Addition and the U.S. Highway 212 area.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Flood Risk Management – Section 205, Trempealeau River, Arcadia, Wisconsin

Arcadia is located in Trempealeau County in west-central Wisconsin, approximately 130 miles southeast of St. Paul, Minnesota. The city is located on the Trempealeau River with Turton Creek and Meyers Valley Creek flowing through town. The area is subject to flooding from the river, as well as from both creeks. The part of town located south of the Trempealeau River is affected by flooding, which includes Ashley Furniture Industries corporate headquarters and manufacturing facility.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Flood Risk Management: Section 205, Red River of the North, Wahpeton, North Dakota

Wahpeton is in Richland County in eastern North Dakota, approximately 55 miles south of Fargo, North Dakota. The Red River of the North and the Bois de Sioux River border the city on the east. The confluence of the Otter Tail River with the Red River of the North is located at Wahpeton. The city of Breckenridge, Minnesota, lies east across the Red River of the North from Wahpeton.
Published: 2/26/2015