Home > Missions > Civil Works > Environment

Related Videos

Env. Sustainability News


1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Corps of Engineers and the Corporate Commission of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe partner on sewer service extension in Mille Lacs County

ST. PAUL, MINN. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District, recently partnered with the Corporate Commission of the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe to expand the existing sewer service in Mille Lacs County, Minn. [Read More]
Published: Oct-02-14

Corps awards $12 million contract to build islands near Lansing, Iowa

ST. PAUL, MINN. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District, recently awarded a nearly $12 million contract to Newt Marine Services of Dubuque, Iowa, to restore habitat within the Mississippi River Pool 9. [Read More]
Published: Sep-26-14

Corps seeks public comments on Mille Lacs County sewer project

ST. PAUL, Minn. – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District, is seeking public comments on the Eddy’s Resort Sanitary Sewer Extension environmental infrastructure project in Mille Lacs County, Minn. [Read More]
Published: Sep-24-14
1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Environment

St. Croix CreekA prime mission of the Corps of Engineers is to strive for environmental sustainability. The Corps recognizes the interdependence of life and the physical environment. The Corps proactively considers environmental consequences of its programs and acts accordingly. The Corps seeks balance and synergy among human development and natural systems by designing economic and environmental solutions that reinforce one another.


Regulatory Program

The Corps of Engineers Regulatory Programs include Section 10 of the Rivers and Harbors Act of 1899 and Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. The St. Paul District's regulatory jurisdiction covers the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin. More information about the Corps regulatory programs can be obtained on our Regulatory main page.


Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration

Section 206 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996 provides authority for the Corps of Engineers to undertake restoration projects in aquatic ecosystems, such as rivers, lakes and wetlands. The Corps evaluates projects that benefit the environment through restoring, improving or protecting aquatic habitat for plants, fish and wildlife. A project is accepted for construction after an investigation shows it is technically feasible, environmentally acceptable and provides cost-effective environmental benefits.

Costs for Section 206 projects are shared between the federal government (65 percent) and a non-federal sponsor (35 percent), in accordance with the Water Resources Development Act of 1996. The maximum federal expenditure per project is $5 million, which includes both planning and construction costs. The federal government will not pay the costs involved for obtaining the lands and/or easements and future operation and maintenance.  


Environmental Management Program

The Environmental Management Program is intended to ensure the coordinated development and enhancement of the Upper Mississippi River system, with primary emphasis on habitat restoration and protection projects. Habitat projects include dredging backwater areas and channels, constructing dikes, creating and stabilizing islands and controlling side channel flows and water levels. In this district, the projects are located along the Minnesota River and Mississippi River from Guttenberg, Iowa, to Minneapolis, a distance of 250 river miles.


Habitat Restoration

The Corps has the authority, provided by Section 1135 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1986, as amended, to plan, design and construct fish and wildlife habitat restoration measures. To be eligible for consideration, restoration measures must involve modification of the structures or operations of a project constructed by the Corps, or modification of an off-project site when it is found the Corps' project contributed to the degradation of the environment.

To qualify under this program, projects must be justified -- that is, the benefits resulting from constructing the project must exceed the cost incurred to design and construct the project. Each separate project is limited to a total federal cost of not more than $5 million, including studies, plans and specifications and construction.  


Completed Environmental Management Program Projects