Wisconsin Congressional District 7 projects and studies

Dam Bridge & Gate Painting – Lower St. Anthony Falls Through Lock and Dam 10

The project is the routine maintenance, including painting and repair of the dam gates. Phase 1 consisted of report development, including alternatives and life cycle costs. Phase 2 of the project analyzed the alternatives, and decided upon an Indefinite Delivery – Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) acquisition strategy with maintenance performed on site.
Published: 2/26/2015

Eau Galle Lake

Authorized purposes for the Eau Galle Lake Project include flood control recreation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife. Eau Galle Lake is located on the Eau Galle River immediately upstream of Spring Valley, Wisconsin, approximately 50 miles east of the Twin Cities of Minnesota.
Published: 2/26/2015

Environmental Infrastructure Assistance: Section 154, Northern Wisconsin

The Section 154 program authorizes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide assistance to northern Wisconsin public entities in the form of design, construction and reconstruction assistance for water-related environmental infrastructure, resource protection and development projects. These include navigation and inland harbor improvement and expansion, wastewater treatment and related facilities, water supply and related facilities, environmental restoration, and surface water resource protection and development.
Published: 10/2/2015

Levee Safety Program: Wisconsin

The basic objectives of the Levee Safety Program are to develop balanced and informed assessments of levees within the program; evaluate, prioritize and justify levee safety decisions; and recommend improvements to public safety associated with levee systems. The Corps created the National Levee Database, inventoried all levees in the program and improved inspection procedures.
Published: 2/26/2015

Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2–10 Miter Gates Replacement

Locks and Dams (LD) 2 through 10 have used the same miter gates since their construction in the 1930s. Over time, the gates have been damaged and distressed, which has led to serviceability and safety issues. This project will replace the gates and the anchorages system, increasing navigational longevity and operational readiness while decreasing repair costs and downtime due to maintenance or failure. Upper Mississippi Locks and Dams 2 through 10.
Published: 9/25/2017

Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2–10 Tow Rail System

The tow rail system is integral to the operation of each of the Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2 through 10. It is attached to the top of the lock guidewall and helps guide tows through the lock chamber. Each system is comprised of an operating unit, rail and traveling kevel or “mule.” The Locks and Dams 2 through 10 tow rail systems have been deteriorating over the past several years, requiring rehabilitation of these systems.
Published: 3/14/2016

Tribal Partnership Program

The Tribal Partnership Program (TPP) provides authority for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to utilize TPP to perform water-related planning activities and activities related to the study, design and construction of water resources development projects located primarily on tribal lands that substantially benefit federally-recognized tribes. To start the process, a tribe submits a study request to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The Corps evaluates the request, and if viable, the Corps works with the tribe to determine a scope of work and enters into a feasibility cost sharing agreement (FCSA). Following the execution of the FCSA, the Corps seeks federal funding for the study.
Published: 9/25/2017

Tribal Partnership Program: Section 203, Big Sand Lake Shoreline Stabilization

The purpose of the project is to arrest erosion along tribal lands on the southeast side of the lake while enhancing access to the water for cultural practices. Fed by groundwater, Big Sand Lake is a clear, soft water lake that has varying levels of algae growth within the year, affecting lake health. The lake, located in Burnett County, Wisconsin, is typically 1,434 surface acres with a maximum depth of 55 feet.
Published: 10/1/2018