Project Review Plans

This page identifies and provides links to Civil Works review plans developed by the St. Paul District.

Review Plans are published in accordance with Engineering Circular 1165-2-214. This circular details quality review requirements for all civil works decision documents.

Review Plans and Description

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Ft. Abercrombie Section 14 is primarily a streambank stabilization project. Ongoing erosion at the toe of the outside bend of the river has resulted in threatening historic building locations. One historic building location has already been lost to the river, another has been partially eroded and others are at risk. Two major areas of erosion are occurring onsite (Northern and Eastern). No significant efforts have been undertaken to slow the erosion at this time. High water on the Red River of the North in spring 2009 and 2010 has further exacerbated the condition of the slope. [Go to review plan]
This Review Plan (RP) defines the scope and level of review for the local sponsor proposed modifications to the Alvarado, Minnesota Flood Risk Management Project. The proposed modifications require Corps of Engineers approval per the provisions of 33 U.S.C. 408. The configuration of the proposed flood protection system is substantially similar to the original USACE engineering design. Significant modifications to the existing levee system are required in order for the flood protection system to obtain FEMA accreditation and to meet current USACE design criteria. Upgrading the flood protection system consists of; bank unloading and realignment of the levee, construction of new floodwalls, placement of erosion control features, stream bank restoration along the Snake River, correction and completion of all inspection work items per USACE Periodic Inspection Report dated June 2010. [Go to Review Plan]
The purpose of this project is to evaluate and design additional measures to reduce the risk of flood damage at the city of Devils Lake, Ramsey County, North Dakota. This project is a unique situation in that it is an emergency project being accomplished under P.L. 84-99 using Flood Control and Coastal Emergencies funding. However, the design is being completed following permanent geotechnical Corps of Engineers dam safety criteria with consideration to hydraulics and hydrology dam safety criteria. [Go to review plan]
The FMM Flood Risk Management Project will result in significant flood damage reduction for the project area. The project consists of a flood diversion channel on the North Dakota side of the Red River of the North. The 36-mile long diversion will consist of two control structures, four river crossings, diversion outlet, four new railroad bridges, and 19 new road bridges. The project is a single purpose flood risk management project with ecosystem and recreational objectives. [Go to Review Plan]
The City of Grafton is located in Walsh County on the northeastern part of North Dakota, along the Park River, a tributary of the Red River of the North. The project consists of a 2.8 mile long Bypass channel, a 7.9 mile long tieback levee, three railroad bridges, one highway bridge, control structure, diversion structure, drop structure, five county road raises, mitigation for loss offloodplain forest habitat, and miscellaneous interior drainage structures. The proj ect will reduce the risk of flood damage at the City of Grafton, and will provide a 100-year level of protection to the community, reducing the community's reliance on emergency construction measures to protect it.
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The Mississippi River 9 Foot Channel is a navigation project on the Upper Mississippi River. This project considers revising channel maintenance activities from LID 2 upstream approximately six miles. In this reach, channel maintenance and navigation have become increasingly difficult in recent years due to changing sediment transport characteristics.
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The purpose of the Marsh Lake Ecosystem Restoration Project is to restore the aquatic and riparian ecosystems in the Marsh Lake area. Marsh Lake is located on the Minnesota River in western Minnesota (Figure 1-1). Lac qui Parle and Marsh Lake Reservoirs form boundaries for Lac qui Parle, Chippewa, Swift, and Big Stone Counties.The lower Pomme de Terre River and in the upper end of the Lac qui Parle reservoir were altered 4 by the 1930’s construction of the Marsh Lake Dam and diversion of the Pomme de Terre River into Marsh Lake which fundamentally changed the ecosystem state.
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The Minnesota River Basin Watershed Study began in September 2008 with the execution of a Feasibility Cost Sharing Agreement between the St. Paul District US Army Corps of Engineers and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Board (sponsor). The primary planning objective is to prepare a plan for watershed, aquatic ecosystem, and water quality management and restoration in the Minnesota River Basin. [Go to review plan]
The Sunrise River Watershed Feasibility Study began in December 2007 with the execution of a Feasibility Cost Sharing Agreement between the St. Paul District US Army Corps of Engineers and Chisago County, Minn. The objective of the Sunrise River study will be to prepare a plan for watershed management and resulting aquatic ecosystem protection and restoration. Federal (Corps of Engineers)
interest in the Sunrise Watershed is based on the potential benefits of improved watershed management and aquatic ecosystem restoration on not only the Sunrise River and it’s tributaries, but also the downstream St. Croix River. [Go to review plan]
The project goal is to revise channel maintenance activities within the reach defined under project location. Historically, channel maintenance in this reach has been accomplished by periodic dredging and material placement onto nearby temporary placement sites. The temporary sites are periodically unloaded to permanent placement sites. In recent years, budget constraints and increased sedimentation has made this approach infeasible. Preliminary hydraulic engineering indicates the potential for significant improvements by modifying the channel alignment.
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The purpose of the Lock and Dam 3 Fish Passage Improvement Habitat Rehabilitation and Enhancement Project is to present the results of a feasibility study undertaken to restore connectivity of the Upper Mississippi River (UMR) for a wide range of migratory warm water fish species. Lock and Dam 3 is located at Upper Mississippi River mile 797, about 41 miles downriver from St. Paul, Minnesota, and 6 miles upriver from Red Wing, Minnesota. [Go to review plan]
The 1958 Sand Hill River Project was constructed for flood control and major drainage improvement. The project enlarged an existing state ditch and channelized the upstream and downstream portions of the Sand Hill River connecting to the state ditch. A series of four concrete drop structures were installed in the new Sand Hill River alignment to provide grade control. These grade control structures created 6 to 8-foot changes in bed grade, which are impassable to fish. The primary goal of the proposed project is to modify the existing drop structure fish barriers in order to reopen the upper Sand Hill River and its tributaries to upstream fish movement and thereby, provide important spawning, rearing, and seasonal habitat for fish species in the lower Sand Hill River and the Red River. [Go to review plan]
The Red River Basin Watershed Feasibility Study began in the summer of 2008 with the execution of a Feasibility Cost Sharing Agreement between the St. Paul District US Army Corps of Engineers, the Minnesota Red River Watershed Management Board and the North Dakota Red River Joint Water Resource District (sponsors). The sponsors will provide 50% of all study costs through non-federal cash and in-kind contributions. The Corps of Engineers funds the remaining 50% of study costs. The study is currently estimated to cost $19,000,000. The study was recommended in the Red River Reconnaissance Study, Section 905(b) (WRDA 1986).
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The project is designed to divert portions of the Roseau River around developed areas for flows exceeding the five year event. A Roseau River flow of 13.3K CFS corresponds to a 100 year event. For this flow, 4.4K CFS will be bypass developed areas through the diversion channel. Storage areas downstream of developed areas are designed to capture and retain peak flows until stages recede. This performance was included to minimize downstream effects of peak flows.
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The city of St. Croix Falls is in the process of replacing its aging wastewater treatment process with emerging wastewater treatment technology. The city’s existing WWTP is over 50 years old. It currently discharges 350,000 gallons of treated wastewater to the St. Croix River daily.
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This study is a single purpose project, the scope of this study includes the entire St. Croix River and connecting tributaries. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s final 2000 biological opinion for the operation and maintenance of the Upper Mississippi River 9-foot navigation channel project concluded that continued O&M, because of zebra and quagga mussels, would jeopardize Higgins eye and result in incidental take of winged mapleleaf. The preliminary estimated cost of a tentatively selected plan is $10,000,000. Interagency mussel
technical experts have produced a list of 27 potential management measures that would likely prevent, minimize, or counteract detrimental effects of Dreissenid mussel infestations on winged mapleleaf mussels. They are generally grouped into categories: Measures to directly conserve winged mapleleaf and measures to manage Dreissenid mussels.
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The overall purpose of the Stillwater Flood and Retaining Wall Project is to provide erosion and flood control protection to the City of Stillwater. The extent of the project is 2000‐feet of riverfront, which is primarily a city park and open space, along the St. Croix River in the heart of downtown Stillwater. The primary essence of the project is to protect and stabilize the existing retaining wall system that provides
shoreline stabilization to the riverfront park and to minimize/reduce the extent of flooding in the historic downtown area. [Go to review plan]
Pool 9 is part of the 9-foot channel project on the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) and was created in 1938 by the construction of Lock and Dam 9. The Harpers Slough study area is a backwater complex located primarily on the Iowa side of the Mississippi River in Pool 9, about 3 miles upstream of Lock and Dam 9 between river miles 665 and 650. The study area is adjacent to the navigation channel and lies in the Harpers Slough Closed Area of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge. The project area is around 4,150 acres and is a complex of islands, backwaters, and sloughs. The habitat concerns within the study area center around the general degradation of habitat quality in lower Pool 9. This degradation is the result of the loss of islands, declining bathymetric diversity, and a decline in aquatic vegetation over the past few decades. [Go to review plan]
Aquatic ecosystem restoration is a primary mission of the USACE Civil Works program and is defined as achieving a IIreturn of natural areas or ecosystems to a close approximation of their" conditions prior to disturbance, or to less degraded, more natural conditionsll. In some circumstances, as at Capoli Slough, a return to predisturbance conditions may not be feasible. In those instances, lithe goal is to partially or fully reestablish the attributes of a naturally functioning and self-regulating system." The goal of this project is to return the Capoli Slough area ecosystem to less degraded, more natural conditions by restoring natural functions and processes. [Go to Review Plan]
The St. Croix Headwaters Watershed Feasibility Study began in October 2007 with the execution of a Feasibility Cost Sharing Agreement between the St. Paul District US Army Corps of Engineers and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WisDNR). WisDNR will provide 50% of all study costs through non-federal work-in-kind contributions. The objective of the Headwaters study will be to prepare a plan for watershed management and resulting aquatic ecosystem protection and restoration. Federal interest in the Headwaters Watershed is based on the potential benefits of improved watershed management and aquatic ecosystem restoration in the basin. It also is important for meeting downstream habitat and water quality goals of the St. Croix River.
[Go to review plan]