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Continuing Authorities Program (CAP)

Under the Continuing Authorities Program (CAP), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is authorized to plan, design and construct certain types of water resource and ecosystem restoration projects without additional and specific congressional authorization. The purpose is to implement projects of limited scope and complexity. Each authority has specific guidelines and total program and per-project funding limits. Studies are cost-shared 50/50 during feasibility. Most projects are cost-shared 65 percent Federal and 35 percent non-Federal during implementation, unless otherwise noted.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration - Section 1135, Sand Hill River

The study area is located in a rural setting in Polk County, Minnesota, 275 miles northwest of Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Sand Hill River basin is centrally located in the Red River Valley watershed. A major reach of the river downstream of Fertile, Minnesota, was the subject of a flood control project constructed by the Corps of Engineers from 1955 to 1958. It involved straightening the river and constructing several drop structures and served as a drainage improvement to local agriculture. Overall, more than 18 miles of the Sand Hill River was straightened or abandoned.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Beneficial Use of Dredge Material - Section 204, Pigs Eye Lake

Pigs Eye Lake is located in Ramsey County, just east of downtown St. Paul, Minnesota. Pigs Eye Lake is located in upper Pool 2 of the Mississippi River. Due to the lake’s close proximity to the Mississippi River, water level is controlled by the level of the river. The lake is located in the Mississippi River Bottomlands subwatershed.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Flood Risk Management - Section 205, Minnesota River, Montevideo, Minnesota

Montevideo is located in Chippewa County in western Minnesota, approximately 130 miles west of St. Paul, Minnesota. The city is at the confluence of the Chippewa and Minnesota Rivers. The area is subject to flooding from both rivers. The three areas that are affected include the 1969 levee area, the Smith Addition and the U.S. Highway 212 area.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Flood Risk Management - Section 205, Trempealeau River

Arcadia is located in Trempealeau County in west-central Wisconsin, approximately 130 miles southeast of St. Paul, Minnesota. The city is located on the Trempealeau River with Turton Creek and Meyers Valley Creek flowing through town. The area is subject to flooding from the river, as well as from both creeks. The part of town located south of the Trempealeau River is affected by flooding, which includes Ashley Furniture Industries corporate headquarters and manufacturing facility.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Flood Risk Management: Section 205, Red River of the North

Wahpeton is in Richland County in eastern North Dakota, approximately 55 miles south of Fargo, North Dakota. The Red River of the North and the Bois de Sioux River border the city on the east. The confluence of the Otter Tail River with the Red River of the North is located at Wahpeton. The city of Breckenridge, Minnesota, lies east across the Red River of the North from Wahpeton.
Published: 2/26/2015

Continuing Authorities Program: Streambank Protection - Section 14, Crow River

The study area is located in a rural setting in western Hennepin County, Minnesota, approximately 40 miles west of Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Crow River, a tributary to the Mississippi River, was experiencing erosion on a reach north of the city of Delano, Minnesota, where the natural course of the river follows a sharp turn adjacent to County Road 50. Erosion at the outside bend of the channel and at the toe of the bank of the Crow River threatened the stability of County Road 50 at the top of the river bluff.
Published: 2/26/2015

Dam Bridge & Gate Painting – Lower St. Anthony Falls through Lock and Dam 10

The St. Paul District operates and maintains 13 locks and dams from Upper St. Anthony Falls in downtown Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Lock and Dam 10 in Guttenberg, Iowa. Each lock and dam is a critical step in the "stairway of water" that makes navigation possible between Minneapolis and St. Louis, Missouri. These facilities are aging structures, with locks and dams 2 through 10 originally constructed in the 1930s. These sites include a dam bridge and varying numbers of dam gates. The moveable dam gates are one of the most critical system components because they control pool elevation for navigation, flood control and environmental purposes.
Published: 2/26/2015

Dredged Material Management Plans - Upper Mississippi River

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District is responsible for maintaining 244 miles of the Upper Mississippi River 9-foot channel navigation system from the head of navigation at Minneapolis, Minnesota, at river mile 857.6 to Guttenberg, Iowa at river mile 614.0. The navigation system also includes the lower navigable portions of the Minnesota, St. Croix, and Black Rivers. Long term planning for dredged material placement has been ongoing since the mid-1970’s, starting with the GREAT (Great River Environmental Action Team) study from 1974 -1980 and is actively managed to maximize beneficial use of the material.
Published: 2/26/2015

Eau Galle Lake, Spring Valley, Wisconsin

Eau Galle Lake is located on the Eau Galle River just outside Spring Valley, Wisconsin, approximately 50 miles east of the Twin Cities in Minnesota. The project is composed of a large earthen embankment, an uncontrolled morning glory control structure and outlet works, overnight camping areas, a beach, picnic areas, a boat launch for non-motorized vessels only, hiking and equestrian trails and scenic overlooks.
Published: 2/26/2015

Endangered Species: Conservation of Native Mussels

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is the lead agency on the Mussel Coordination Team (MCT). Other members of the MCT include the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Park Service, the U.S. Coast Guard and the Departments of Natural Resources from Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa and Illinois.
Published: 2/26/2015

Environmental Infrastructure Assistance Program: Section 569

The Section 569 program authorizes the Corps to provide public entities in the 18-county northeastern Minnesota area assistance in the form of design and construction assistance for water-related environmental infrastructure and resource protection and development projects, including projects for wastewater treatment and related facilities, water supply and related facilities, environmental restoration and surface water resource protection and development.
Published: 2/26/2015

Environmental Infrastructure Assistance Program: Section 219, St. Croix Falls

In 2004, the city reported it was experiencing rapid population growth as a result of its proximity to the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropolitan area. As a result of the rapid growth and the aging of its present 50-year-old wastewater treatment facility, the city needed to update or replace its existing wastewater treatment plant. The existing treatment plant employs a trickling filter technology with anaerobic digestion of sludge.
Published: 2/26/2015

Environmental Infrastructure Assistance: Section 594, North Dakota

The program authorizes the Corps to assist public entities, in the form of design and construction for water-related environmental infrastructure, and resource protection and development projects in North Dakota. These projects include wastewater treatment and related facilities. They also include combined sewer overflow, water supply, storage, treatment, and related facilities, as well as environmental restoration and surface water resource protection and development.
Published: 2/26/2015

Feasiblity Study: Souris River Basin

The Souris River in the North Dakota cities of Burlington, Minot, Logan, and Sawyer had a flood of record in 2011 with flows of 27,000 cubic feet per second. These flows devastated the communities and caused evacuations of more than 10,000 residents and millions of dollars in damage to private and public property. In the mid-1970s, a series of major flood events occurred. To protect the communities, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers constructed a series of Public Law 84-99 emergency levees, which were later incorporated into the Federal project.
Published: 2/27/2015

FERC Licensing

Granting licenses for private hydropower development at Federal facilities falls within the purview of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). Private hydropower facilities currently in operation at St. Paul District sites include Xcel Energy at Upper St. Anthony Falls, SAF Hydropower at Lower St. Anthony Falls, Twin Cities Hydropower (Ford Hydropower) at Lock and Dam 1 and the city of Hastings Hydropower at Lock and Dam 2.
Published: 2/26/2015

FERC: Hydropower, Crown Hydro

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued license 11175 to Crown Hydro, LLC, in 1999 which granted it the exclusive rights to develop a hydropower facility in the Mill Ruins Park area on the Mississippi River near Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Crown Hydro Project was originally proposed to be located in the Crown Roller Building and then, later, on Minneapolis park land. Crown Hydro was unable to secure the needed real estate agreements with the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board. In 2013, Crown Hydro made a proposal to locate the project on Corps-managed Government land at Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam. The total 3.4-megawatt estimated capacity would be enough to provide power to more than 2,300 households.
Published: 2/26/2015

FERC: Hydropower, Lock and Dam 2

The city of Hastings, Minnesota, holds Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license 4306, which granted it the authority to design, construct and operate a hydropower facility on the Mississippi River at Lock and Dam 2 in Hastings. The licensed facility consists of a powerhouse, which is adjacent to the dam and contains two 2,200-kilowatt turbine/generators and a power distribution system. The total 4.4-megawatt estimated capacity is enough to provide power to 3,500 households.
Published: 2/26/2015

FERC: Hydropower, Lower St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam Hydro

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued license number 12451 on Feb. 21, 2006, granting the authority to SAF Hydropower, LLC, to construct and operate a hydropower facility on the Mississippi River at Lower St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The hydropower project includes an 8.98-megawatt generating system composed of a 16-unit turbine matrix, a control building, a transmission line and ancillary facilities. The total capacity of the plant is enough to provide power to 6,200 households.
Published: 2/26/2015

FERC: Hydropower, Symphony, Minneapolis

On June 26, 2014, Symphony Hydro LLC filed an application with FERC for a preliminary permit, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to study the feasibility of a hydropower project to be located within the lock chamber of the Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock in Minneapolis, Minnesota. FERC granted permit number P-14627 to Symphony Hydro on October 22, 2014.
Published: 2/26/2015

FERC: Hydropower, Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam Hydropower

Northern States Power Company (aka Xcel Energy) holds Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license number 2056, granting it the authority to operate the hydropower facility located at Upper St. Anthony Falls in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Published: 2/26/2015

Flood Control Sites (MN)

Project locations: Orwell Lake on the Otter Tail River, approximately six miles southwest of Fergus Falls, Minnesota; Highway 75 Dam on the upper Minnesota River near Odessa, Minnesota; Lac qui Parle on the Minnesota River near Montevideo, Minnesota; Red Lake Dam located at the outlet of Lower Red Lake in the northeastern part of Clearwater County, Minnesota.
Published: 2/27/2015

Flood Control Sites (ND)

Project locations: Homme Lake, two miles west of Park River, North Dakota, on the South Branch of the Park River; Lake Ashtabula (Baldhill Dam), 12 miles northwest of Valley City, North Dakota, on the Sheyenne River; Lake Darling, operated by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, approximately 20 miles northwest and J. Clark Salyer Wildlife Refuge, is 65 miles northeast of Minot, North Dakota.
Published: 2/27/2015

Flood Plain Management Services (FPMS)

The Flood Plain Management Services program is authorized by Section 206 of the 1960 Flood Control Act, as amended. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers developed the FPMS program specifically to address the needs of people who live and work in floodplains to know about the flood hazards and the actions they can take to reduce property damage and prevent the loss of life caused by flooding. The program’s objective is to foster public understanding of the options for dealing with flood hazards and to promote prudent use and management of the nation’s floodplains.
Published: 2/26/2015

Flood Risk Management: Fargo-Moorhead Metro

The Fargo-Moorhead metropolitan area is a major health, educational, cultural and commercial center. The area is prone to flooding. The Red River of the North has exceeded the National Weather Service flood stage of 18 feet in 51 of the past 113 years (1902 through 2014), and recently every year from 1993 through 2014 except 2012. A 500-year event would flood nearly the entire city of Fargo, a large portion of the city of Moorhead and several smaller communities in the area.
Published: 2/27/2015

Flood Risk Management: Park River at Grafton, North Dakota

Grafton is in Walsh County, North Dakota, along the Park River, a tributary of the Red River of the North. It is about 340 miles northwest of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Recurrent flooding along the South Branch and main stem Park River has caused significant problems for Grafton. In 1950 the largest flood of record nearly inundated the entire city.
Published: 2/27/2015

Flood Risk Management: Red Lake River, Crookston

Crookston is in Polk County in northwestern Minnesota, approximately 25 miles east of Grand Forks, North Dakota. It is located on the Red Lake River, 52 river miles upstream from its confluence with the Red River of the North at East Grand Forks, Minnesota. Significant flooding in Crookston has been documented as far back as 1887. Major floods occurred numerous times in the past 40 years. The flood of record is 28.6 feet in 1997. The Red Lake River rose to 26.38 feet - 11 feet above flood stage - on April 9, 2001.
Published: 2/27/2015

Flood Risk Management: Red River of the North, Breckenridge, Minnesota

Breckenridge is in Wilkin County in western Minnesota, approximately 200 miles northwest of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and 55 miles south of Fargo, North Dakota. The Red River of the North and the Bois de Sioux River border the city on the west. The Otter Tail River flows from the east, bisecting the city. Wahpeton, North Dakota, is located to the west across the Red River from Breckenridge. The devastating flood of 1997 in the Red River basin generated a strong response at all levels of government to implement permanent flood risk management projects for urban communities along the Red River of the North.
Published: 2/27/2015

Flood Risk Management: Roseau River, Roseau, Minnesota

Location/Description Roseau is located in the northwestern corner of Minnesota in Roseau County
Published: 2/27/2015

Flood Risk Management: Devils Lake

To continue to meet the appropriate combination of levee and dam safety standards, it was necessary to raise the existing embankments protecting the city of Devils Lake, North Dakota and extend the embankments to high ground. Previously, the embankments had been constructed to an elevation of 1,460 feet.
Published: 2/27/2015

Flood Risk Management: Silver Jackets (MN)

Silver Jackets teams are collaborative State-led interagency teams, continuously working together to reduce flood risk at the State level. Through the Silver Jackets program, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, additional Federal, State and sometimes local and tribal agencies provide a unified approach to addressing a State’s priorities. Often, no single agency has the complete solution, but each may have one or more pieces to contribute.
Published: 2/26/2015

Flood Risk Management: Silver Jackets (ND)

Silver Jackets teams are collaborative State-led interagency teams, continuously working together to reduce flood risk at the State level. Through the Silver Jackets program, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, additional Federal, State and sometimes local and tribal agencies provide a unified approach to addressing a State’s priorities. Often, no single agency has the complete solution, but each may have one or more pieces to contribute.
Published: 2/26/2015

Flood Risk Management: Silver Jackets (WI)

Silver Jackets teams are collaborative State-led interagency teams, continuously working together to reduce flood risk at the State level. Through the Silver Jackets program, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, additional Federal, State and sometimes local and tribal agencies provide a unified approach to addressing a State’s priorities. Often, no single agency has the complete solution, but each may have one or more pieces to contribute.
Published: 2/27/2015

Habitat Restoration: Mississippi River, Conway Lake, Lansing, Iowa

The Conway Lake Habitat Rehabilitation and Enhancement Project (HREP) is located in Pool 9 of the Upper Mississippi River, immediately upstream of Lansing, Iowa. The Conway Lake study area includes Conway Lake, Phillipi Lake, Shore Slough, Zoll Lake, as well as the adjacent island and slough habitat. The entire study area is approximately 1,170-acres in size. The study area lies within the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge.
Published: 2/26/2015

Habitat Restoration: Mississippi River, Harpers Slough, Pool 9, Iowa

Part of the Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program, the Harpers Slough area is a 4,150-acre backwater area located primarily on the Iowa side of the Mississippi River in Pool 9, about 3 miles upstream of Lock and Dam 9. The site is in the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge. The area is used heavily by tundra swans, Canada geese, puddle and diving ducks, black terns, nesting eagles, bitterns and cormorants and is also significant as a fish nursery area. Many of the islands in the area have been eroded or lost because of wave action and ice movement. The loss of islands allows more turbulence in the backwater area, resulting in less productive habitat for fish and wildlife.
Published: 2/26/2015

Habitat Restoration: Mississippi River, Capoli Slough

Part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program, the site is a side channel/island complex located on the Wisconsin side of the Mississippi River navigation channel in Pool 9, about five miles downstream of Lansing, Iowa. The site is in the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge. Many of the natural islands bordering the navigation channel and extending into the backwater have eroded and many are disappearing. Erosion from wave action and main channel flows is reducing the size of the wetland complex, resulting in the loss of aquatic vegetation and the shallow protected habitats important for the survival of many species of fish and wildlife.
Published: 2/26/2015

Habitat Restoration: Mississippi River, Lake Winneshiek

Lake Winneshiek is a 6,000 acre backwater lake on the Wisconsin side of the Mississippi River navigation channel in lower Pool 9 about 4 miles downstream from Lansing, Iowa. The site lies within the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge. Many of the natural islands in Lake Winneshiek have eroded and disappeared. These islands served to break up wind fetch and wave action, reduce turbidity and provide protection to shallow aquatic areas supporting aquatic plant beds. The increased wave action and associated turbidity have contributed to the observed loss of aquatic plant beds used by migratory waterfowl.
Published: 2/26/2015

Habitat Restoration: Mississippi River, Lower Pool 10 Islands

Part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program, the site is a side channel/island complex located on the Iowa side of the Mississippi River navigation channel in Pool 10, about 1 mile upstream Lock and 10 in Guttenberg, Iowa. The site lies within the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge. Many of the natural islands bordering the navigation channel and extending into the backwater have eroded and are disappearing. Erosion from wave action and main channel flows is reducing the size of the wetland complex, resulting in the loss of aquatic vegetation and the shallow protected habitats important for the survival of many species of fish and wildlife.
Published: 2/26/2015

Habitat Restoration: Mississippi River, McGregor Lake

Part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program, McGregor Lake is a 200-acre backwater lake in Pool 10 of the Mississippi River near Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. It is bordered on the west by islands separating it from the main channel and on the east by a peninsula separating it from the east channel. The lake lies within the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge. It is relatively shallow, with an average depth of 2½ feet. In 1989, about 75 percent of the lake had aquatic vegetation. Since then, aquatic vegetation and depth have decreased because of increased sedimentation and turbidity resulting from erosion of the barrier islands.
Published: 2/26/2015

Habitat Restoration: North and Sturgeon Lakes, Pool 3

North and Sturgeon Lakes are large backwater complexes located in Pool 3 of the Upper Mississippi River, west of the navigation channel. The project area includes a marshy area at the upstream end and encompasses Sharp Muskrat Lake as well. Historically, these two lakes had an extensive marshy fringe and considerable submersed aquatic plant beds. Today, both lakes are shallow and subject to frequent wind and wave action that keeps sediments suspended and limits aquatic plant growth.
Published: 2/26/2015

Habitat Restoration: Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Upper Mississippi River Restoration Program includes studies and projects in the Upper Mississippi River system north of Cairo, Illinois. The system includes the Illinois River. The habitat project component includes dredging backwater areas and channels, constructing dikes, creating and stabilizing islands and controlling side channel flows and water levels. In the St. Paul District, the projects are located along the Minnesota and Mississippi Rivers from Guttenberg, Iowa (Lock and Dam 10), to Minneapolis, Minnesota, a distance of about 250 river miles. The long-term resource monitoring component includes monitoring trends and impacts with respect to selected resources, developing products for resource management decisions and maintaining river information databases.
Published: 2/26/2015

Hydropower, Twin Cities Hydro (Ford Plant)

Twin Cities Hydro, LLC, holds Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license number 362, which allows it to operate the Ford Hydropower plant on the Mississippi River in St. Paul, Minnesota. The hydropower facility consists of a powerhouse, four 5,800-horsepower Francis turbines and four 4,880-kilowatt generating units, a 2-foot-high inflatable flashboard system atop the concrete dam spillway and a power distribution system. The total capacity of the plant is 17.92 megawatts, or enough to provide power to 14,500 households.
Published: 2/26/2015

Levee Safety Program (Iowa)

The basic objectives of the Levee Safety Program are to develop balanced and informed assessments of levees within the program; evaluate, prioritize and justify levee safety decisions; and recommend improvements to public safety associated with levee systems. The Corps created the National Levee Database, inventoried all levees in the program and improved inspection procedures. The Corps is developing a method to manage its levee systems and is reviewing and revising current levee-related policies and procedures.
Published: 2/26/2015

Levee Safety Program (Minnesota)

The basic objectives of the Levee Safety Program are to develop balanced and informed assessments of levees within the program; evaluate, prioritize and justify levee safety decisions; and recommend improvements to public safety associated with levee systems. The Corps created the National Levee Database, inventoried all levees in the program and improved inspection procedures. The Corps is developing a method to manage its portfolio of levee systems and is reviewing and revising current levee-related policies and procedures.
Published: 2/26/2015

Levee Safety Program (North Dakota)

The basic objectives of the Levee Safety Program are to develop balanced and informed assessments of levees within the program; evaluate, prioritize and justify levee safety decisions; and recommend improvements to public safety associated with levee systems. The Corps created the National Levee Database, inventoried all levees in the program and improved inspection procedures. The Corps is developing a method to manage its portfolio of levee systems and is reviewing and revising current levee-related policies and procedures.
Published: 2/26/2015

Levee Safety Program (Wisconsin)

The basic objectives of the Levee Safety Program are to develop balanced and informed assessments of levees within the program; evaluate, prioritize and justify levee safety decisions; and recommend improvements to public safety associated with levee systems. The Corps created the National Levee Database, inventoried all levees in the program and improved inspection procedures.
Published: 2/26/2015

Levee System Evaluations for the National Flood Insurance Program

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) agency-wide process for completion of levee system evaluations in support of the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) as administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). FEMA administers the NFIP program, which focuses on the 1-percent annual chance exceedance flood, also, referred to as the 100-year or base flood. The FEMA 100-year flood is a flood insurance standard, not a public safety standard.
Published: 2/26/2015

Level of Service Reduction at the Twin Cities Locks and Dams

Constrained funding and the Nation’s fiscal deficit have led to reduced operations and maintenance funding within the Corps Inland Marine Transportation System (IMTS). When coupled with deteriorating infrastructure and increasing costs of operation, it became clear that the level of service the Corps has been providing at some locks and dams is not sustainable.
Published: 2/27/2015

Lock and Dam Winter Maintenance

Lock and Dam 5A is located near Winona, Minnesota. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed the facility in 1932 as part of the overall 9-foot channel project and it began operation in 1936. After more than 50 years of service, the Corps undertook a major maintenance program in 1989 to update much of the operating equipment and construct a new control building, which was completed in 2000. Lock and Dam 5A is unique in that the control building actually sits on an island in the Mississippi River.
Published: 2/27/2015

Locks and Dams 2-10 Embankment Rehabilitation

Earthfill embankments are integral to each of the Mississippi River Locks and Dams 2 through 10. The purpose of this project is to reestablish and armor degraded embankments to prevent further erosion and potential failure during high water events. The existing rock protection is well past its intended design life and does not perform satisfactorily. Wave action from high water causes continued widespread erosion.
Published: 2/26/2015

Lower Pool 2 Channel Management Study

Pool 2 is the navigation pool created by the construction of Lock and Dam 2 at Hastings, Minnesota, at river mile 815.2. The pool is approximately 32.4 miles long and stretches upstream to Lock and Dam 1 in Minneapolis at river mile 847.6 (often referred to as the Ford Dam). Between river miles 818 and 820, the navigation channel switches from one bank of the river to the other and back again creating a near 90-degree bend in the river at mile 819.
Published: 2/27/2015

Marsh Lake Ecosystem Restoration Project

Marsh Lake is on the Minnesota River between Swift and Lac qui Parle Counties near Appleton, Minnesota. The Marsh Lake Dam is owned and maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as part of the Lac qui Parle Flood Risk Management project. The fixed-crest dam holds a conservation pool in the upper portion of the Lac qui Parle Reservoir. The Works Progress Administration constructed the dam and rerouted the Pomme de Terre River into the reservoir between 1936 and 1939.
Published: 2/27/2015

Minnesota River Basin Integrated Watershed Study

The Minnesota River originates in southwestern Minnesota at the Minnesota-South Dakota border. It drains 16,770 square miles in Minnesota, South Dakota, North Dakota and Iowa. It flows 335 miles to join the Mississippi River at Mendota, Minnesota, just south of St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minnesota. The hydrology of the basin has been significantly altered, leading to increased erosion, impaired water quality, substantial sediment and nutrient loads, and degraded aquatic ecosystems in the Minnesota River, Mississippi River, and the Gulf of Mexico.
Published: 2/27/2015

Mississippi River 9-Foot Project Channel Maintenance

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District is responsible for maintaining 244 miles of the Upper Mississippi River 9-foot channel navigation system from the head of navigation at Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Guttenberg, Iowa. The navigation system also includes the lower navigable portions of the Minnesota, St. Croix, and Black Rivers.
Published: 2/26/2015

Mississippi River 9-Foot Project, Locks and Dams

The St. Paul District is responsible for maintaining 244 miles of the Upper Mississippi River 9-foot channel navigation system from the head of navigation in Minneapolis, Minnesota, to Guttenberg, Iowa. The project is located in or contiguous to Minnesota, Wisconsin and Iowa. The navigation project within the St. Paul District includes 13 sets of locks and dams that are operated and maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In addition to the locks and dams the project includes channel maintenance, recreation and natural resource activities.
Published: 2/27/2015

Mississippi River Basin: Regional Discharge-Frequency Study

The Upper Mississippi River corridor is a popular vacation and retirement area and is experiencing continued growth. Much of the area has not been previously studied, and flood risks have not been adequately defined. The Upper Mississippi River Regional Discharge-Frequency Study is conducting hydrologic analyses for development of a consistent set of frequency distributions for discharge and elevation for the Upper Mississippi River from the headwaters area of Lake Bemidji downstream to St. Paul, Minnesota. This study will directly inform floodplain management decisions in 13 counties in Minnesota.
Published: 2/27/2015

Mississippi River Headwaters Reservoirs

The Mississippi River Headwaters Project consists of six headwaters dams in north-central Minnesota. Cross Lake, Gull Lake, Big Sandy Lake, Lake Winnibigoshish, Pokegama Lake and Leech Lake make up the headwaters lakes system. They were constructed or reconstructed between 1900 and 1913 (work on Pokegama started in 1884 and Winnibigoshish in 1885) to aid navigation on the Mississippi River between St. Paul, Minnesota, and Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin.
Published: 2/26/2015

Mississippi River Lock and Dam 1, Ambursen Dam Downstream Repair

Lock and Dam 1 is located on the Minneapolis side of the Mississippi River. The purpose of this project is to re-establish armor downstream of the concrete apron. The existing rock protection consists of grouted derrick stone. This stone bedding has broken up and washed downstream, exposing bedding material and risking failure of the wooden piles and sheet pile located underneath the existing concrete apron.
Published: 2/26/2015

Mississippi River Recreation and Environmental Stewardship

The Mississippi River recreation and environmental stewardship functions are headquartered in La Crescent, Minnesota. The organization includes Blackhawk Park, a recreation area located 30 miles south of La Crescent with overnight camping, day-use areas and boat launching facilities. Operation and maintenance of three additional boat accesses at Bad Axe, Millstone and Jay’s Lake Landings are also administered by this organization.
Published: 2/27/2015

Planning Assistance to Lakes: Lake Wausau Water Quality Study

The study is located in the central Wisconsin River basin in the city of Wausau, Marathon County, Wisconsin. Specific areas of study include the main body of Lake Wausau and rivers tributary to the lake.
Published: 2/26/2015

Planning Assistance to States (PAS) Program

The Planning Assistance to States (PAS) program, also known as the Section 22 program, is authorized by Section 22 of the 1974 Water Resources Development Act (WRDA), as amended. This law provides authority for the Corps of Engineers to assist States, local governments and other non-Federal entities in the preparation of comprehensive plans for the development, use, and conservation of water and related land resources. Section 208 of WRDA 1992 amended WRDA 1974 to include eligible Native American Indian tribes as equivalent to a State.
Published: 2/26/2015

Planning Assistance to States: Wisconsin River Water Quality Study

The large hydropower impoundments on the Wisconsin River from Lake DuBay to Lake Wisconsin experience noxious summer blue-green algae blooms due to excessive phosphorus loading. Petenwell and Castle Rock flowages are listed on the Federal Clean Water Act 303(d) impaired waters list due to dissolved oxygen and pH standards violations and are also listed for fish consumption advisories due to the presence of PCBs and dioxin.
Published: 2/26/2015

Project Alteration Reviews: Section 408

Title 33 USC 408 authorizes the Secretary of the Army to permit others to alter and modify an existing Corps project in certain circumstances. Within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the authority to approve Section 408 permissions has been delegated to the Director of Civil Works at Corps headquarters. Approval for minor or routine alterations may be delegated to district engineers within the Corps. The Corps may grant permission for the alteration or permanent occupation or use of any of its public works when in its judgment such occupation or use will not be injurious to the public interest and will not impair the usefulness of the Federal works.
Published: 2/26/2015

Red River of the North Basin-Wide Feasibility Study

The Red River of the North basin covers 45,000 square miles and occupies substantial portions of North Dakota, northwestern Minnesota, southern Manitoba and a small portion of northeastern South Dakota. Land use in the basin is primarily agricultural, but several urban centers are located along the Red River main stem and tributaries. While extensive drainage systems have resulted in extremely rich agricultural areas, portions of the basin still support the ecologically abundant prairie-pothole region. Flooding is a major concern for residents in the basin; frequent floods have impacts on urban and rural infrastructure and agricultural production.
Published: 2/27/2015

Red River of the North Comprehensive Watershed Management Plan

The Red River of the North basin is an international, multi-jurisdictional watershed of 45,000 square miles, with 80 percent of the basin lying in the United States and 20 percent in Manitoba, Canada. Eighteen Minnesota counties and 22 North Dakota counties lie wholly or partially in the basin. The river flows to the north, bringing water and nutrients to Lake Winnipeg in Manitoba. Flooding and loss of native habitat are significant issues in the Red River basin.
Published: 2/27/2015

Section 524, Minnesota Dams

Section 524 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2000 (WRDA 2000) provided for inventory, inspection, modification and/or rehabilitation of dams originally constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps, Works Progress Administration, and Works Projects Administration (WPA) in Minnesota. Oversight of 361 of the original 417 WPA dams falls to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR) through the office of the State Dam Safety Engineer. The rest are owned and operated by individual counties and the National Park Service.
Published: 2/26/2015

Souris Basin Section 408

The Souris River flows from Saskatchewan, Canada, into North Dakota and then back into Canada. The Souris River in the North Dakota cities of Burlington, Minot, Logan, and Sawyer had a flood of record in 2011 with flows of 27,000 cubic feet per second. These flows devastated the communities and caused evacuations of more than 10,000 residents and millions of dollars in damage to private and public property.
Published: 2/26/2015

Souris Court Levee Repair, Minot, ND

The Souris River flows from Saskatchewan, Canada into North Dakota and then back into Canada. Minot is a city located in north central North Dakota with a population of approximately 46,000 residents. Above normal precipitation during the summer and fall of 2010 left much of the eastern portion of Saskatchewan saturated. The winter of 2010 and 2011 then saw snowfall significantly above normal throughout the basin. The Souris River in the Minot area started to rise in April 2011 and continued to rise throughout May 2011.
Published: 2/27/2015

Souris River Hydrology and Hydraulics Studies

The Souris (Mouse) River is located in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada, and North Dakota. The headwaters of the basin comprise several rivers in Saskatchewan that meet near the international border and flow into North Dakota. The Des Lacs River joins the Souris upstream of Minot near Burlington, North Dakota. The Souris River then flows through Sawyer and Velva, North Dakota, before turning back to the north and flowing into Manitoba.
Published: 2/26/2015

St. Croix River Feasibility Study: Endangered Mussel Conservation

Zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) in the Upper Mississippi River are a significant threat to the endangered Higgins eye pearlymussel (Lampsilis higginsii) and winged mapleleaf (Quadrula fragosa). The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District and Engineer Research and Development Center are conducting a study in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; the National Park Service; the Departments of Natural Resources from Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Iowa; and the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission. Recommended management alternatives outside the Corps’ existing authorities would need to be implemented by others.
Published: 2/27/2015

St. Croix River Project Channel Maintenance

The St. Paul District is authorized to maintain a 9-foot navigation channel on the St. Croix River from the mouth at the confluence with the Mississippi River near Prescott, Wisconsin, to river mile 24.5 near Stillwater, Minnesota. The authorized width is 200 feet. A 3-foot channel is authorized from river mile 24.5 to river mile 51.8 near Taylors Falls, Minnesota. The authorized width for this reach is 25 feet, and the controlling depth is 1 foot at extreme low water.
Published: 2/27/2015

Stillwater Flood and Retaining Wall Project

Stillwater, Minnesota, is located on the St. Croix River approximately 15 miles east of St. Paul, Minnesota. The St. Croix River is a tributary of the Mississippi River and is designated a Wild and Scenic River. The purpose of the Stillwater project is to provide flood damage reduction and protection to the city of Stillwater.
Published: 2/27/2015

White Rock Dam

Lake Traverse is located near the junction of Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota in the headwaters of the Red River of the North on the Bois de Sioux River. Lake Traverse is composed of two dams, two lakes, and Browns Valley dike at the southern end of the project. White Rock Dam, which forms Mud Lake, is at the extreme north end of the project and controls water flowing north on the Bois de Sioux River.
Published: 2/27/2015